Art110-2016-Fall-banner

Schedule

Need Help?

  1. Ask online
  2. Come to before class OH on Wed 11:30-12:30 @Robek’s / Coffee Bean umbrella tables
  3. I can go to AS-120 (AS building is next to The Beach Hut, next to The Library) after class on Wed, at 3:45 and help anyone with anything.
  4. Make an appointment to meetup another time
students sketching by the side of the pond at the CSULB Japanese Garden

Maritess & Co sketching pondside at the CSULB Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden

a very white Adidas athletic shoe with 3 black stripes against a pebbled sidewalk at the CSULB Earl Burns Miller Japanese garden

Everybody wants Raul’s cool Adidas!

Points on BeachBored

All points through Week 8 are now up on BeachBored. Be sure to check your points and know where you stand! So far we’ve had 423 points possible. Here’s how many points you should have to be on track for each grade level, and how many peeps in 1p / 2:30 are currently at each grade level:

A = 381 points – 58 / 48
B = 338 points – 4 / 6
C = 295 points – 1 / 2
D = 252 points – 0 / 0
F = 251 points – 2 / 6

  • 1p GPA = 3.79
  • 2:30 GPA = 3.45

Leaderboard

Top 5 @1pm:

Hannah Adams & Roxana sitting on a bench at the CSULB Japanese Garden and smiling at the camera

Hannah Adams & Roxana Chavez

We shared Choco Pockys as we compared answers to the questions of the week…

  1. Hannah Adams, 512
  2. Stephanie Arciva, 496
  3. Maritess Anne Inieto, 479
  4. Joy Elizabeth Uba, 468
  5. Carlos Villicana, 468

Top 5 @2:30:

  1. Lydia Chang, 558
  2. Nathan Davalos, 546
  3. Jamie Van, 498
  4. Yesenia Hernandez, 497
  5. Adriana Maciel, 475
Photo overlooking The Brewery campus

The Brewery / Downtown LA

EC: Brewery Art Walk

22-23 October, 11am – 6pm
breweryartwalk.com

Speaking of Artwalks, a big one is coming up. The Brewery is a former Pabst Blue Ribbon beer brewery that’s been converted into a giant artist live-work loft space. Hundreds of artists have spaces there and about 150 or so will open their studios for the artwalk weekend.

Extra Credit:

  • Visit studios
  • Chat with artists
  • Take selfie w artist
  • Write a thoughtful paragraph about their work
  • Blog it
  • 5 points EC / artist
  • Up to 10 artists, so up to 50 points EC
  • Post by next Sunday night, Oct 23.

Wk 9 – This Week!

  • Art Talk Discussionat the bottom of this post
  • ActivityArt Care Packages
  • Artist Conversation@SOA Galleries
  • Classmate Conversationnone this week

Write next week’s Classmate Question OTW here: Classmate Question OTW

Last Week – Sketching @Japanese Garden

pencil sketch of the CSULB Earl Burns Miller Japanese garden by Brian Sath

Brian Sath

This week the class went over to the Japanese Garden. It is actually my first time at the garden, even though I’m going into my third year here at CSULB. It is truly a beautiful garden compared to Cal Poly Pomona’s Japanese Garden. Besides that, the week had been really stressful for me with so many science mid terms. I really enjoyed being at the garden because it was so scenic and peaceful. I enjoyed just sitting by the pond and sketching on the rocks. If you look below, my first sketch was not that great. I figured out that the messier I draw it, the better it looks. I hope you agree from my second sketch! The contour drawing was interesting. At first, I wasn’t too sure as how to start or where I was supposed to look. Once Andy explained it to me, I was able to come up with something, however, it truly is unfortunate that I can’t draw well. I tried to combine my representations together so that it would look nice, and I tried my best, however, the rocks took me forever to complete. I struggled with the abstract because I think abstractly so I just sat there and didn’t know where to begin. Overall, I enjoyed this activity and would love doing more in the future.

Brian Sath

sketch of the pond area at the CSULB Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden by Briana Garcia. Graphite on sketch pad. Draughting pencil.

Briana Garcia

Sketching at the garden was actually pretty soothing. I sat with a few classmates but we weren’t really talking. All of us were so focused on our sketching so it was quite and relaxing. I used to draw a lot when I was younger so this activity brought me back to those days. I used to stare at something, anything and I would try to draw it. It was challenging though because when I draw, I like to incorporate detail and I like to mimic it exactly. This is what made sketching difficult. Sketching is more of a quick and easy thing. I took too much time trying to make my drawings look exact so I couldn’t resist erasing. This made it frustrating but sitting there in silence, looking at my view and drawing was pretty calming. Maybe I should do this more often…

Briana Garcia

drawing of a duck and a koi fish in the pond at the California State University, Long Beach, Japanese Garden

Chely Lozano

After class I went back to work and I showed my co-workers my art drawings. They made fun of them lol. (Of course they were joking with me lol). One that they found especially funny was of my duck sleeping. They said that it looked like a cell, then they said it looked like an amoeba, which it kind of did. The next day me and my co-workers went to the Japanese Garden during lunch to draw some more. I drew a koi fish and a duck. they came out okay looking lol. It was just fun going with my co-workers and being able to have fun and make fun of their drawings as well.

Chely Lozano

landscape sketches drawn at the CSU Long Beach Japanese Garden by Demi Kong

Demi Kong

These were my first two sketches. The leaves on my first sketch of the zen garden look very sparse compared to the actual scene, but it got tedious very fast lol. My favorite things about the first sketch are the rocks and the shape of the tree. The long hedge is hard to identify by the picture itself, but I think it’s decent. The little gate at the edge of the zen garden was fun to draw though!

Demi Kong

sketches of birds on rocks at the CSU Long Beach Japanese Garden by Hannah Adams

Hannah Adams

I’ve always loved Japanese Gardens. They are always so peaceful, but yet so fun to explore. There is always a beautiful carving or a rock garden tucked away waiting for someone to discover it. There was so much to draw, it felt like an hour of sketching didn’t quite do it justice. I enjoyed doing the quick 30 second sketches because I felt it was a good way to discover what I most wanted to draw. I surprisingly enjoyed the contour drawing of the garden. I thought it would look like illegible scribbles, but it ended up looking like a really neat abstract picture of the water’s edge. My favorite was still the representational drawings, particularly the one of the branch. I think when people go to a garden to sketch, they can often assume that they should try to get the whole garden into the picture. As if it should always be about doing a landscape-type sketch that encompasses every aspect of the garden. But I find the greatest pleasure in finding something small. A single leaf, a crooked branch, or a stone statue tucked behind the foliage are all examples of tiny subjects that can be wonderful pieces of art. Sketching can be more (or in this case less) than an all-encompassing landscape. Sometimes for the best sketches, one must look to find the right subject.

Hannah Adams

pencil sketch of the pond and plants at the CSULB Japanese Garden

Rei Joseph Cayabyab

The leaves of the plants was probably the most challenging since it required so much detail. And if you notice, the plants that I drew were incomplete. As I was sketching, my friend Janis, began taking pictures of the ducks. Therefore, I began sketching him using the method that Professor Zucman taught us by beginning with a stick figure and just adding aspects that gave the stick figure more depth.

Rei Joseph Cayabyab

a series of short, "10-second", sketches of different elements in the CSULB Japanese garden: an umbrella, a duck, a fence, and so on

Belen Barragan

I went and I drew and I was thinking how fun and relaxing it was. I was so excited I sent a quick picture to my boyfriend of my quick sketches (which I was most proud of my little duck). I went on to do a longer sketch of the fish and one of the ducks since I had liked how my quick sketch came out… I really liked the tip of not using the eraser when sketching. I think that the extra lines give the drawing a very textured look. It was my first time going to the Japanese Garden in my 3 years at CSULB so it was nice to see something beautiful that my school has to offer.

Belen Barragan

quick sketch of a woman in a puma hat

Darryl Nguyen

This picture is my favorite. I was drawing my friend who was to the right of me and I thought it looked nice. She thought it looked nice and even took a picture of it to save. I felt good having been complimented for my art.

Darryl Nguyen

a page of small sketches of elements in the CSULB Japanese Garden by Emily Tomasello

Emily Tomasello

I think it’s pretty cool that we are able to escape from all the craziness that is college and head down to the Japanese Gardens. It’s hard to believe that you’re on a college campus because it honestly feels like its own little world down there.

Sketching in the garden was honestly such a relaxing experience, not even exaggerating. I had an 8:00 am class in the morning and then work from 10:00-1:00 pm, so I headed over to the garden right after that to get a head start on my sketches. I was really stressed out in the morning because I had a lot going on, so I was definitely looking forward to getting away from the insanity and going to the tranquil garden. From the giant trees to the cute, little ducks, the orange koi fish to the detailed structures, there was a lot to get inspired by.

Emily Tomasello

quick sketches from around the CSULB Japanese Garden by Lydia Chang

Lydia Chang

ah, I was late on Wednesday so I couldn’t draw anything then.

Why is the garden so crowded on Sundays? This is a legit question. Rhetorical, of course. And I already know the answer… LOL

Anyways, I walked in expecting a calm afternoon in the gardens. Boy, was I wrong. I walk in and there are children running around and people taking photographs all over the place and it was hot. I look at my phone and read the first item on the menu: 10 30-second drawings. I have a confession, most of these might’ve taken longer than 30 seconds.. BUT THAT’S BECAUSE I KEPT GETTING DISTRACTED aka keep looking up and stare at the scenery.

If anything, this was an interesting project and I would actually not mind doing this again. (Although, I would try not to be an hour and a half late. I’m sorry again… I saw the gates locked and I was actually about to cry.)

Lydia Chang

sketches in the Japanese Garden

Lydia Chang

Art Talk OTW

  1. 3 Million Years of Art History
  2. Joseph DeLappe
  3. Mahsa Soroudi
  4. The Mind in the Cave
  5. Graffiti Writing: Bomb It
  6. Classical Greece & Rome
  7. Renaissance & Baroque
  8. 19th Century
  9. Aesthetics & Beauty and Realism & Romanticism

Interactive Art History Timeline

If you want to play with the Art History Timeline that you see me using in these talks, you can get your very own copy & the Freemind software to view, modify, or make your own, here:

Written by Glenn Zucman

BA, Psychology, University of Hawaii, MFA, Intermedia Art, Long Beach State. Host of American Public Media's "Border Patrol." Host of KBeach Radio's "Strange Angels." Interested in Identity Art that explores our Oracle-at-Delphi-like straddling of corporeal and virtual realms in our new media century. Civil rights in online space. 10 years...
Read more

90 Comments

Claudia Sanchez

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” …. yea it kind of is sort of an open ended question. I wouldn’t so much end any conversation or writing with that sentence instead I think I would start with it. True; everyone has their own perceptions and ideas of beauty but, in order to find truth to the statement I think you need to be willing to open yourself up as an individual to justify your views. You can’t say this cliché and be closed off, you gotta be willing to say who you are. Personally I think beauty is dangerous when it comes to art because I associate beauty with superficial. I think beauty is a glance at something, knowing just the basics, or getting just a taste. I think although beauty attracts; it fades. I if I were to literally just pass by “Birth of Venus” by Bouguereau in a museum I would say wow such a beauty. But I’m only saying that because I caught a glimpse of it and I know nothing about its background. But if I sit there, examine the characters painted, think about the context of the setting, learn about the artist, learn about the time it was painted, I could probably come up with some story or find facts that make my views of this beautiful painting fade. If I get the time to connect life with this painting it may not be so beautiful after all. That’s why I think this also reflects romanticism because it’s just a fantasy. Sometimes beauty and romanticism are a brief and great getaway for the mind but that’s because it’s not the truth. So I agree with the line in Hamlet that; beauty lies. Beauty and romanticism are nice, comforting, inspiring and make us feel happy but only briefly. Realism is harsher and sometimes ugly but, I think it’s more constant and present in life. Not to say that life is horrible or should be awful all the time but, you have to find the balance between beauty and realism, you have to be able to remember and accept that beauty will fade and realism eventually kicks in. I also find it funny that when we think of beauty a female entity is depicted. Even the quick images of males that were shown towards the end of the video seem to have a female looking quality to them. I had to pause the video in order to tell if they were really male, I still don’t know about the first two. Do we not think that beauty also applies to manly figures, or is beauty simply for women?
-Clauda Sanchez

Reply
Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

Hello Claudia,
I also agree that the quote, “beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” is open ended. I think that most people say this because they do not want to or are not willing to express the way that they view things. In saying this, I think that most people can agree that they have their own opinions and views on certain things. With that being said, people should be open minded and be willing to hear what others have to say so that they can gain new insight on certain things. Not only should they be willing to listen to others, but they should be ready to express how they feel on a certain piece of art or topic as well. I do not think people should argue or anything like that, but a simple conversation and expressing of different points of views would be beneficial to both parties in my opinion. In doing this, I feel that you and whoever you talk to can walk away with new knowledge and a different outlook on art or life in general.

Reply
Fatima Negrete

I agree with you Claudia when you said that we all have different preferences in what beauty is. For example, when you said that if you passed by and saw the painting of Venus you would consider it beautiful in a first glance. The same for me because when I saw the painting of Venus I was like it looks beautiful to me because its location is at the ocean. I find the scenery of the beach beautiful because it looks like paradise. However, to others they might not find the Venus painting beautiful because she is nude and the beach to them is dirty. Nonetheless, we all have different preferences in what beauty is.

Reply
amazeeana23

Hi Claudia,
I do agree with you in regards to yout thoughts on “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. However, I do believe one has to learn to love themselves, and see themselves as beautiful, before they attempt to see anything else as such. I’ve noticed this in myself, when I used to be massively insecure and I would always think to myself “I’m so ugly” but I slowly learned to love myself, and was when I viewed everything so much differently. I used to be envious and wouldn’t appreciate the beauty around me. I also agree with you that Realism is clearly harsher than Romanticism, but if you don’t learn to see the world explicitly around you, you’re going to live your life as a lie.

Reply
Zjlinney

Linney Sar

Hi Claudia,

Your concept on how beauty fades is very significant. Currently and constantly many things are popular, but as new ideas are incorporated many things of beauty fades. Beauty is appreciated as a dream of an unrealistic reality to avoid the real reality. However a balance is needed to create a distinction between the two realities. Like in Alice in Wonderland as Alice dream of a separate reality and enjoy the chaos of another world instead of facing her old reality of what is real. I rather face what is real instead of not knowing what is really happening.

Reply
Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

In today’s society, there are is lots of beauty in art and concern about aesthetics. In my opinion, the beauty of art and lots of things in life is viewed subjectively by many people in the world. Personally, I view art in a very subjective manner. For example, in the video, I did not think that Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon was very appealing to the eye. On the other hand, I thought that the painting of the Birth of Venus was quite fascinating to look at. Beauty is subjective to everyone, although you should not say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. In saying that, you should be able to explain how you feel about art, and listen to other people’s point of views on the same pieces of art. It should not be something to say to end a conversation, but more so to start one. In overusing that phrase, you can also exhaust the meaning behind it, and it kind of just becomes something with no meaning at all. I do feel that beauty is subjective, but we should not leave it at just our opinions. We should be willing to discuss with others and maybe get new insight as to what people think beauty is. In my opinion, I feel that realism reflects how life is more accurately than romanticism. I think that is shows up more in our lives, because it is supposed to depict our lives no matter how difficult they may be. I prefer Romanticism though, as it is kind of like fantasy and what we would like life to be. Like the video said, beauty is truth. Despite that, there can also be beauty in lies as well, or in this case, fantasy.

Reply
Jamie Van

Hi Mark,
In my mind, art and beauty in life is viewed with more importance put on the surface. Things are viewed subjectively in art for most people, even myself. I agree that Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon was not very appealing to the eye. I want to say that it was but Picasso’s work was less appealing to me. I prefer more realistic pieces of art but I did think it was interesting how he had made almost an illusion with his artwork because at every angle or means that one looked at his works, one might interpret something new. At the same time, it is not what I define as beauty. I also agree that after watching these talks, it made me really think about how beauty is subjective and how beauty is relative to an individual. Sometimes, people agree and sometimes, they do not. There is no right answer to the interpretation that people take on beauty and art as it is the meaning that an individual takes from a piece of work that helps define its place in their heart.

Reply
Nathan Davalos

I agree with Mark when he says that beauty should be something that you start a conversation off with and not end one with. This is because whom ever you are speaking with can give you more information about the art piece and your opinion on the art piece may change. I believe that everyone is invited to their own opinion, however people need to be open to criticism about their opinions because they may find something out that they did not know about. Beauty is a hard topic to talk about about because some people may think that a certain thing/person is beautiful but another may think that it/that person is the ugliest thing in the world.

Reply
Fatima Negrete

Fatima Negrete
I remembered in high school I had to read Keates poem Ode on a Grecian Urn. I remembered that one of the class assignments was to paraphrase each line which was a pain in the ass, because there would be lines that I did not understand. Luckily, my AP English teacher helped us decipher each line. The way the urn is described sounds beautiful. Once again, I remembered seeing the movie Hamlet in my AP English class. That was my very first time that I ever heard about Hamlet. I found it crazy when I found out that the king’s own brother killed him. The homeless painting of Bouguereau looks beautiful I could care less if it is true or not as long as it makes me think about something. For example, if someone painted the Garden of Eden then I will find it beautiful, even though there may not be truth in there. As long a painting makes me go into my state of imagination I will find it beautiful. When he said that Alice said the real world is boring (dull) and that she needs her imagination. I can agree with her because when we imagine anything is possible. However, in the real world there are limits.

Reply
cslabell

Hey Fatima…. WOW each line?!?!?! Geeeeeeez thats crazy but seems like they would assign that in an AP class. I bet it was a pain, but i also bet the end results of the students varied and produced some interesting interpretations. Hamlet was pretty cool when i firsr heard it, because i just thought dang this was probably the first time the storyline was done. Now i bet Hamlet inspires several movies and tv shows. And you are right, if something makes you feel and think about something then i think its done its job. I liked the painting too, i think the portrayal has beautiful characteristics but it doesnt fall into realism. And thats ok too. Ive always said its important for the imagination to have its place in life. Maybe not all the time but definetly sometimes.
-Claudia Sanchez

Reply
cslabell

Hey Fatima…. WOW each line?!?!?! Geeeeeeez thats crazy but seems like they would assign that in an AP class. I bet it was a pain, but i also bet the end results of the students varied and produced some interesting interpretations. Hamlet was pretty cool when i firsr heard it, because i just thought dang this was probably the first time the storyline was done. Now i bet Hamlet inspires several movies and tv shows. And you are right, if something makes you feel and think about something then i think its done its job. I liked the painting too, i think the portrayal has beautiful characteristics but it doesnt fall into realism. And thats ok too. Ive always said its important for the imagination to have its place in life. Maybe not all the time but definetly sometimes.
-Claudia Sanchez

Reply
Daniel Martinez

Daniel Martinez
Beauty in art is very easy to see, and very easy to misinterpret too. Analyzing the painting, its characters, the background, its message is something that each individual will have a different opinion on. The Birth of Venus painting is very appealing to the eye; however, just how one of the students mentioned above, one needs to sit and observe the painting really well. Really understand and see the beauty of the painting, its message. The homeless painting of Bouguereau moreover, can easily be misinterpreted. When someone thinks of homelessness, its not beauty. Homelessness to many gives a feeling of loneliness, sadness, depression. The painting is interpreted a different way though. The family does not have any bad clothing, nor is it ripped. Just how Professor Zucman mentioned, the painting has this message that if people were to see homelessness as depicted in the painting, then anyone won’t mind having homelessness. I believe that beauty is subjective, and should be talked among others to really interpret the beauty that others see within. The second video talked about Realism and Romanticism. Although realism can be harsh at times, it is part of life and its something we have no control of. Realism depicts the conflicts that society faces, some are good and some are bad. Whether its preferred or not, realism is something each individual has to face because realism reflects a lot about life.

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Hi Daniel,
I definitely agree with you! People perceive homelessness as someone feeling lonely, sad, or depressed when really it isn’t like that because it’s different for everyone. Everybody sees everything differently and I feel like even though people see homelessness as something sad, it can be a life that someone feels blessed to even live in. And that’s the beauty of it – when a person sees what others don’t. For example, if someone came to school or work looking clean or happy, maybe that’s all they have and they don’t want to be perceive as someone being homeless. People can say that person is happy, but deep down no one knows what they’re going through and all of this is similar to art. We don’t known what the artist was feeling and we cant assume that they felt lonely just because they painted something sad.

Reply
leslie2213

Daniel,
I liked the way in which you describe beauty, i completely agree with you. When Glenn spoke about the painting that portrayed homelessness, i was shock. What today we consider homelessness to what the people in the 1800’s is was very different. Homelessness unlike this picture is someone who does not have a home and has ripped clothing, smell weird, and are dirty. As opposed to how Bouguereau portrays homelessness it is a different understanding of what it means to us now. Although it is beauty it qualified by the truth, which i suppose is the way homeless people looked before. Speaking about the second video, realism is the best thing one can do and be. Although like you mention sometimes it can be harsh, but we all need to know the truth that is either to progress in life or to change something about ourselves.

-Leslie Meza

Reply
leslie2213

Leslie Meza
Watching the two videos made me think of what beauty actually means. Glenn and I were talking about how the phrase “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” doesn’t make sense because it is too general just like how objects loose their meaning. My definition of beauty before watching the video of beauty and realism was that beauty is something that is pretty. Although that seems kind of general too, i can’t find any other way to explain it. After watching the video i can conclude that beauty can be defined through the truth. For example, the painting of Pablo Picasso which speaks with a lot of truth about prostitutes. As Glen mentions, Picasso’s face on the painting looks terrorized and maybe that is because of the different disease these prostitutes may have had. In the second video of realism vs romanticism demonstrates its own paintings and definition for each term. I think that realism is needed to define something as beauty. Romanticism which can lead from beauty i believe is where there is strong feelings for another person. These two videos help with the understanding of what these terms really mean. Although many of us use one term to define another we usually have general beliefs of what one word may mean to us.

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Tiffany Phan
In the last part of the video on when Dale Wasserman wrote, “–to see life as it is and not as it should be,” really caught my attention because it’s very true. I feel like a person should force something to be a certain way, but instead to accept it for what it is. And this phrase shouldn’t apply to just something but to people as well. I fee like if you don’t like the way something is done, try to make it better in a way that will help everyone and not just yourself because at the end of the day you cant please everyone. I believe that art should be perceived this way as well. We cant change art, we just have to try to take the time and understand it, understand why the artist created it that way. I feel like both realism and romanticism are both okay. Realism gives you the sense of reality obviously and that’s what we need in life and romanticism is like an inspiration we have searching for hope like an imagination. Just like Alice when she thought Wonderland was a real world and it felt like she was there forever, but later she realized is was an endless imagination that was too good to be true.

Reply
giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

Hi Tiffany, I agree that people should not force things but instead accept things for what they are. This causes problems because people may try to change their personality in order to get someone to like them, but in the end their true self will show. After everything is said and done both parties will be disgruntled with their failed relationship. The “beautiful” relationship was created by lies, so when truth is shown the beauty’s reputation is dampened. I also agree that understanding is the solution to some of the lack of beauty in realism. If understanding is found in art then the severity of ugliness can diminish. If one understands why things are the way they occur, lack of beauty is not criticized as harshly.

Reply
Emily Tomasello - Art

Hi Tiffany!
That Dale Wasserman quote caught my attention, too. You talked about how people shouldn’t force something to be a certain way and just accept things for what they are, and this had me thinking of how people use filters on their pictures today. Not trying to bash anybody or anything because I totally do it sometimes, too, but I feel like Romanticism is definitely present today as well! People can slap a filter on their selfies because they think that is how they SHOULD look versus how they ACTUALLY look. Obviously Romanticism has taken on a new form today, but it is definitely still alive.

Reply
Jamie Van

Jamie Van
There was a lot going on in regards to society’s focus on beauty in art and aesthetics. The one that I found most interest in was the Indigent Family by William-Adolphe Bouguereau from 1865 illustrates a woman and three children in a very realistic form. This would be a piece that would have a lot of aesthetic novel put on it for its realistic beauty. Furthermore, it demonstrates a sense of empathy for the figures within the painting as one comes to think of poverty when they look at the mother with her children, who seem to be starving on the walls of a street. This type of work would easily be deemed as appealing to the eye with its meaningful depiction of life and made me really think about how beauty is subjective because while this painting might have been my favorite, someone else might have seen Picasso’s work as more novel.

Reply
hrandonbong

Brandon Hong

Hey Jamie in regards to your comment I still think there’s a lot going on when it comes to society’s focus on beauty in art and aesthetics. Probably because beauty is always changing, probably on a daily basis. I would probably have to disagree with you on the Indigent Family though. Like everyone else I have my own opinion and believe that it is very uncomfortable to look at. Probably because whenever I see a homeless person out on the streets, I feel pity for them because no one should live a life like that. They didn’t choose to live that life, and some are even born into it. So you were right that someone else might like Picasso’s works more. Anyways thanks for the comment, I really enjoyed expressing my views with you.

Reply
hrandonbong

I believe that the beauty of art and many other things in this world are viewed more subjectively than objectively. Personally, I view art in a very subjective manner. For example, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon was very appealing to the eye in my opinion. I also thought that the Birth of Venus was quite fascinating to look at especially when I first saw it in my mythology books. The whole battle between Cronos and Uranus is still fresh in my mind which led to the birth of Aphrodite. It’s ironic how we speak of beauty in this discussion and the goddess of love and beauty is in here. Everyone has their own opinion on beauty for example I can say dogs are the cutest things in the world while others might disagree, it all just depends on who you are. What I meant by bringing up this piece of tangent is that art can be viewed and discussed in many different ways. For example my highschool english teacher’s favorite line “Call me Ishmael” had deeper meaning to her. She explained it as a wandering soul roaming the Earth having nowhere to call home. I saw a boring old book. By viewing art subjectively you find new meaning in the piece and a deeper understanding of the artist.
In my opinion, I feel that realism reflects how life is like rather than the romanticism point of view. I believe it connects more with our lives because it is supposed to depict us no matter how ugly it gets. Although life is more realism I like to get lost in fantasy where I ignore my problems and just pass my time in another world. You can probably guess I’m more of a romantic than a realist.

Reply
hrandonbong

Brandon Hong
Forgot to write my name so I double posted

I believe that the beauty of art and many other things in this world are viewed more subjectively than objectively. Personally, I view art in a very subjective manner. For example, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon was very appealing to the eye in my opinion. I also thought that the Birth of Venus was quite fascinating to look at especially when I first saw it in my mythology books. The whole battle between Cronos and Uranus is still fresh in my mind which led to the birth of Aphrodite. It’s ironic how we speak of beauty in this discussion and the goddess of love and beauty is in here. Everyone has their own opinion on beauty for example I can say dogs are the cutest things in the world while others might disagree, it all just depends on who you are. What I meant by bringing up this piece of tangent is that art can be viewed and discussed in many different ways. For example my highschool english teacher’s favorite line “Call me Ishmael” had deeper meaning to her. She explained it as a wandering soul roaming the Earth having nowhere to call home. I saw a boring old book. By viewing art subjectively you find new meaning in the piece and a deeper understanding of the artist.
In my opinion, I feel that realism reflects how life is like rather than the romanticism point of view. I believe it connects more with our lives because it is supposed to depict us no matter how ugly it gets. Although life is more realism I like to get lost in fantasy where I ignore my problems and just pass my time in another world. You can probably guess I’m more of a romantic than a realist.

Reply
Pamela Ajoste

I definitely agree with you. People tend to view the beauty of art more subjectively than objectively. They interpret things based on how they feel, emotions and aesthetics instead of basing it on facts and things that are measurable. I also look at things subjectively. It all depends on how I feel for me to decide whether I like it or not. Beauty is defined differently by everyone. I also think that realism proves that not everything has beauty and can sometimes show the ugly side of life.

Reply
Nathan Davalos

Nathan Davalos
In my opinion everybody has their own definition of beauty. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and can decide what is beautiful to them and what is not. I may think that a certain painting is a beautiful, but another person can be looking at the same painting and just see a bunch of lines and colors. Someone that creates an art piece may be attempting to depict beauty in a painting/drawing/photo/etc. but they can not be offended if someone does not have the same views as them. Looking at some of the art in the videos above I don’t see the women as being beautiful, this may be because of different preferences that men have had through the many years. I personally have grown to love art more and more as this semester has gone along, before this semester I saw art as a hobby and didn’t analyze it for the meaning behind it. Now I have learned to analyze the piece and see that art is beautiful.

Reply
megansalinas11

Megan Salinas
Hey Nathan, I totally agree with how everybody has their own definition of beauty. There are so many different perspectives and preferences that could assist in how one person views something as beautiful. To one person, something could have no meaning just because they don’t find any relation or any meaning behind it; whereas, if the artist themselves or someone who can find relation or meaning it were to see it, they are obviously going to see the beauty within it. I feel that beauty is a very point of view topic due to the fact that there are bound to be people who might not find beauty to be in every aspect of life, like some.

Reply
melissapassarelli

Nathan,
I agree with you that beauty can be seen differently whether it is an actual picture or just lines and colors. Beauty can be noticed by anyone while at the same time having either the same or different views as other people while not getting offended. I also agree with you that men see women differently like how you mentioned that you don’t see the women in the videos above beautiful but others may see them as beauty which shows how beauty is looked at differently by many individuals. Art is more than just a hobby that needs to be analyzed for it’s meaning in order to understand it better while discovering that art is beautiful.

Reply
Daniel Martinez

Hello Nathan,
I also agree with you that beauty really depends on the perspective of a person. A painting may be seen beautiful to one person while another person does not agree with the other person’s perspective. Everyone has a different way of analyzing and interpreting objects. I also agree with you that an artist cannot get offended if someone viewing their piece does not understand the message being revealed or perhaps simply just do not like the image. They need to understand that everyone has a different perspective and mind set; what may be appealing to one’s eyes, it may not be the same to another.

Reply
Dabidlai

David Lai

Hello Nathan, I am heavily intrigued by your statement of “everyone being entitled their own opinions.” These days, whether political, or social, people with different opinions seems to let those ideas diminish their friendships due to differences. I think that people should learn to appreciate that their are always another point of view to consider when voicing a claim. Sometimes people forget that their is a Constitutional Amendment of freedom of speech, and that suddenly when someone does not agree, it is not okay to become angry. Art tackles these opinions and creates thinking minds. I feel that in the midst of the craziness going on in everyone’s lives and their own battles being faced, art helps us escape from that reality. I am glad that you have taken an interest in the many forms of art, Nathan.

Reply
amazeeana23

Ana Gomez
“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” – nah I’m just playing, but if the case was that “beauty is truth” then most of the pieces of art wouldn’t be beautiful because they’re lies, like in the Birth of Venus. Everyone perceives beauty differently, and looks at everything subjectively, instead of objectively. For example the Birth of Venus, I don’t feel like those women are beautiful, but if I thought about it deeper than just naked individuals, I would see it as something more. Another example that ties into this, is realism and romanticism like we viewed in the video. It brought back memories to when I read the play “A Streetcar Named Desire, with the deeper meanings to everything; the names of individuals, of places, as well as everything that was occurring. I used to believe people just created art as something to pass time, or have fun. Little did I know everything truly has deeper meaning to it.

Reply
Jessica Obrique

The first sentence of your response, haha! Maybe beauty is a lie? Thinking about it, what we find beautiful are idealizations. The painting of the Birth of Venus depicted an unrealistic image of an ideal woman. We don’t actually expect this scene to be played out in real life. With that said, many people, including me find this image beautiful. Maybe we are looking for perfection that can only exist in paintings? But nevertheless, there are beautiful things that do exist in the world that hold the truth. I find those things even more beautiful than something that can’t possibly exist in my life.

Reply
megansalinas11

Megan Salinas
I really enjoyed the videos above and how in depth Glenn got with the topic of beauty. The definitions and different questions that could be asked about the topic of “beauty” really get you thinking. The meaning of beauty can be interpreted differently by every single person, it’s really just the way that one sees things. It’s kinda like the saying, “one man’s trash, is another man’s treasure,” in a sense that to one person, that painting of a sunset could be just a painting of a sunset; however, to another person, that painting of a sunset could be something that they find infinite beauty in with a lot of meaning. Beauty, in my opinion, is really just a preference thing and how one perceives something that may or may not have beauty to someone else.

Reply
justinphamm

Justin Pham
I like how you mentioned that the video got you to think more about what beauty really is. I felt the same, but had my same view overall, where everyone has their own interpretation of aesthetics. Everyone has a different sentimental sensation to every painting or art form they see, and as a result, they have more of a reaction to it, which makes it more or less beautiful for them. It’s the sensation that allows people to connect with art or life that tells whether or not it’s beautiful.

Reply
melissapassarelli

Melissa Passarelli
The video of Aesthetics and Beauty was really interesting to me because I think that beauty can be seen differently by many people. Glenn uses an example of John Keats and his poem with the line “Beauty is truth, truth Beauty.” This line can be seen differently by many individuals. Some may see beauty as the truth and some may not. This line is compared to the paintings like the Birth of Venus and Indigent family. These two paintings may seem really beautiful to people but it doesn’t contain truth like how Keats mentioned. The paintings contain people that are living differently whether it is extremely rich or homeless but it is not exactly how it is today in the world. On the other hand, Keats saying can be seen as the truth like the painting “Woman and Bicycle”. Whether or not people see it as beauty, it is true because it shows that William De Kooning has had difficult relationships with woman where many individuals today have had as well.

Reply
justinphamm

Justin Pham
From my experience, aesthetic has always been big in today’s society. Everything has to be aesthetic. Whether it be from instagram pictures, to fusion foods, to physical fitness, or simply detailing. This relates to the video in that everyone views beauty differently. “Beautify is in the eye of the beholder,” and as much as others say it’s too broad or general, I truly believe the phrase. Beauty varies among each individual and everyone has their own interpretation of elegance and detail. It’s the detail to everyone’s taste that makes each person different. Hence, the reason why art has so many different mediums, because people find others more fascinating to use, such as installations versus paintings and what not.

Reply
gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
I agree with Justin, now in days everything has to be Aesthetic. Everyone tries to make everything so perfect and beautiful, but the real Aesthetics I believe in comes naturally, not an edited picture, or something tampered with to look gorgeous. The naturalness of things is what mostly attracts an individual’s eyes. People will always have a different opinion in things, you can not call something ugly or not aesthetic, because there will always be someone who finds the true meaning and beautiful in things.

Reply
amybecerraart

Amy Becerra
I agree with Justin because I also believe that aesthetics are significant and influential in today’s society. It seems that the most influential people are the ones who succeed at being the most “aesthetic”. They are also the ones who everyone tries to be like. I think that being beautiful is more sought after now than it has ever been before.

Reply
brianamgblog

Hey Justin!
I touched on this idea in my post too. I used my Instagram feed as an example of aesthetics and how it’s so common now. But like you said, it’s everywhere. In this sense, it’s mostly seen through pictures. Personally I think it’s cool seeing how people can snap a picture of their food or something specific like their accessories. Like the others were saying, I also see how it may seem like that is what people are striving for. I do agree with Gabriel in that aesthetics is something that should partially come naturally. I don’t think it can be forced, it just happens. In most cases, it’s people looking at something and saying “oh this looks cool”.

Reply
gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
In my perspective beauty and aesthetics is something that can not truly be defined by one. Everyone has different things they like, and as some people find something aesthetic, others may think it is ugly. One part of the video i found really interesting was when Wasserman states, “to see life as it is and not as it should be”. This makes me think of the way people do photo-shop or simply edit their pictures in order for people to think they are beautiful or simply notice them. What this quote means to me is that things are how they are for a reason, theres no need to try and make yourself look better in a picture, because at the end of the day, you will still be the unedited version you.

Reply
Valeria Gonzalez

Hi Gabriel,

I agree that every person has their own way of perceiving beauty and their own preferred aesthetics. However, I somewhat disagree in the fact that things are how they are for a reason. If a person edits their picture because they think they look better in the edited version, then I don’t find anything wrong with that. I would find it sad if they edit their pictures in order to fit in society’s definition of beauty. This editing topic made the topic of plastic surgery pop into my head. I’m all for people getting procedures that make them feel better about themselves as long as they are doing it for themselves rather than to please society. The reason why I feel this way is because plastic surgery addiction is a psychological issue that could endanger someone’s health and life. Individuals who develop addiction to plastic surgery are typically doing so in order to fit society’s definition of what beauty is. I know editing a picture is not as invasive as plastic surgery, but I bet a lot of people who edit their pictures would get plastic surgery done if given the opportunity in order to “fix” whatever it is that they edit in their pictures.

Reply
samanthagomezblog

Hi Gabriel, I really like your analysis. Especially how you tie it with an example that many of us know/see today. I whole heartedly agree with your analysis on the meaning ofe Wasserman’s quote. Many individuals today are so focused on what others believe beauty is, but do not take the time to see beauty the way it is.

Reply
Valeria Gonzalez

I find beauty to be very subjective and found in a myriad of ways. When I first look at an object or an art piece, I look at the physical appearance and move on. However, it is different when I look at people. I think that people definitely possess intellectual beauty that cannot be perceived by the human eye. This intellectual beauty can only be “seen” if one gets to know the person. When it comes to art, the art piece must really resonate with me if I wish to look past its physical beauty. I have never read Hamlet, but I’ve read Romeo and Juliet. I feel that beauty played a big role in why Romeo and Juliet fell in love so rapidly and thus, why they died for each other. I found the Birth of Venus painting to be aesthetically pleasing while the Woman and Bicycle painting doesn’t really meet my criteria of beauty. However, I would want to know someone’s reasoning as to why they found the Woman and Bicycle painting beautiful because it’s always interesting to hear other’s opinion. Although Romanticism and Realism may look like the complete opposites of each other, I find that they both provide beauty in different ways. Romanticism is the type of beauty that is easy to look at while realism provides beauty in ordinary things. Personally, I like a balanced dose of romanticism and realism in my world. It’s really therapeutic to submerge myself in a fairy tale world, but I must also keep track of everything that is going on in the world.

Reply
Bunny Horn

Valeria Gonzalez,

I also find beauty to be very subject and it was interesting. Different people have their own way to describes beauty. I also agree that when I looked at art piece. I just focus on the physical appearance, but I never pay attention to the meaning. I want to say, it is true that intellectual beauty can only be “seen” if one gets to know the person and most people posses intellectual beauty that cannot be perceived by the human eye. I believe that each of us has different kind of beauty. I have also read Romeo and Juliet and I also fell that beauty does played a big role. True, the Birth of Venus painting to be anesthetically pleasing while the Woman and Bicycle painting does not really meet the definition of beauty. The painting has it way to describes beauty. It may seem that romanticism and realism may look like the complete opposite. I agree that the balance of romanticism and realism.

Reply
Bunny Horn

This week video is based on the Aesthetics & Beauty and Realism & Romanticism. What is aesthetics? An aesthetics is a set of principals concern with the nature and appreciation of beauty especially in art. There are so many definitions with the word beauty, it depends on your own experience. For example, Aristotle and Plato has their own definition of beauty. In the 1800s, John Keates describes beauty, in the Ode on a Grecian Urn, is beauty is truth. Plablo Picasso painted the Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon in the 1907, which describes the beauty, terror, and horror of the street. Another painting that describes beauty is painted by Willem de Kooing. Beauty can connect with gender. In addition, we have to talk about realism and romanticism. What is realism? Realism is the attitude or practice of accepting a situation as it is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly; the summit was marked by a new mood of realism. There is more definition for realism. Romanticism is a movement in the arts and literature originate in the late 18th century, emphasizing inspiration, subjectivity, and the primary of the individual. Buffy Summer and Lewis Carroll is one example that describes romanticism. Good example of romanticism is a play called, Man of La Mancha and it was written by Dale Wasserman. I learned a lot from the video.

Reply
itsjazelle

Jazmin Mejia

This week’s discussion video is about aesthetics in the 19th century. Aesthetics is the appreciation of beauty especially when it comes to art. Personally, I think that beauty is subjective because I may find something beautiful but my friend/sibling/parent/whomever may not find it beautiful. For example, I actually found Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon to be appealing to me. I liked the abstractness of that painting and I also found the Birth of Venus painting to be appealing too but on a different scale. It was an idealistic painting compared to the Picasso’s abstract painting. Furthermore, I prefer paintings that are in between romanticism and realism but lean more to romanticism. I kind of like to live in the clouds than to be grounded but I still know that realism is something that everyone one of us has to face because it reflects events about life.

Reply
beansartblog

Hey Jazmin,

I agree with your point on aesthetics in the 19th century. I love how this can even be applied to art, no matter what it is, aesthetic always plays a role when it comes to appreciating beauty. From movies, to plays, you can always find something beautiful. I also lean towards romanticism, that quote of Alice really got me. Some of us don’t want to face reality, and some do. In my case, I’d rather live in my dreams.

Arvan Arguelles

Reply
Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma

Hi Jazmin,
I also believe beauty is subjective and not everyone will agree with what you personally think is beauty. Everyone will always have there own interpretation of beauty. You mentioned that you thought both the Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and Birth of Venus paintings to be be appealing but you seemed to find the Les Demoiselles d’Avignon painting of Picasso more appealing. However, I feel that the Birth of Venus painting is more appealing in which I really think is beautiful. Our different view points of these two paintings come to show that the interpretation of beauty is different between us. You will have your own connections to the Les Demoiselles d’Avignon painting and I will have my own to the Birth of Venus painting.

Reply
Jose Perez

Jose Perez
Hey I also agree with you when you stated you may not agree with someone if they believe something is beautiful that you may not. It’s definitely true. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion and this is true to opinions. In my response, I also dated this which I completely agree with you.

Reply
Pamela Ajoste

I think that beauty in art is definitely viewed in a subjective manner rather than objective. People tend to interpret things based on how they feel, emotions and aesthetics instead of basing it on facts and things that are quantifiable and measurable. In my experience, I tend to look at things subjectively. Everyone has their own opinion of beauty. While other might think it’s beautiful, some may disagree and think differently. Realism proves that not everything has beauty and an aesthetic side. Sometimes, it can get ugly. On the other hand, romanticism is the opposite of that. It makes ugly things beautiful.

Reply
itsjazelle

Hey Pamela

I agree with you that we tend to interpret beauty based on our emotions rather than facts. Honestly, I don’t even think that there is an objective way to measure beauty because we are all biased in one way or another. Even when we say that we aren’t going to be biased we still are because we are humans not machines/robots. We will always have our own opinion so therefore beauty can’t ever really be objective which I’m totally fine with. And if it was to suddenly turn objective it would be boring because there would be no diversity in opinion.

-Jazmin Mejia

Reply
adrianagmaciel

Hey Jazmin

As I was reading Pamela’s comment I read yours as well and you said exactly what I was thinking while reading Pamela’s comment! As humans it is tremendously hard to separate ourselves from our ideas, emotions and thoughts therefore, making it impossible for us to be unbiased. In my opinion, that is what makes art so beautiful and intricate for us, that no one looks at it in the same way. For example, a hundred different people can look at one piece of art and it could be interpreted a thousand different ways and every person will have their own personal thoughts and ideas based on who they are as a person. Even if the artist intended it to be interpreted in a certain way, it is always up to the viewer to see what they want to from a piece of art.

-Adriana Maciel

Reply
beansartblog

Arvan Arguelles

Realism is the attire or practice of acceptation a situation as it is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly. Another definition of this is described to be the quality or fact of representing a person, thing, or situation accurately or in a way that is true to life. This term is applied in the late 19th century. Romanticism in the other hand is found in the late 18th century, which emphasizes inspiration, subjectivity, and the primacy of the individual. A few people who pushed romanticism would be Buffy Summers, Lewis Carroll, and Dale Wasserman. Their contributions to this movement was shown in their plays, and movies, signifying a deeper meaning within their lines in the dialogue. These lines are very deep, and require a little more thinking to see the significance of them. I love how art can be very broad, even in dialogues you can see the movement.

Reply
Felix Huynh

Yeah I agree that art is really broad and can influence people of any era. The idea of realism and romanticism is interesting because of the fact that it is nearly the opposites of each other. One is about defining situations and people “accurately” to how they are supposed to be viewed in life, while the other is more about exaggerations or fantasies of an event to show it as more of a relatable or personal connection. It’s cool to see the supporters of romanticism and what their views of the world around them compared to a realistic view. It shows how everyone really does have their own view of the world because of personal experiences.

Reply
giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

I agree with Professor Zucman on the statement “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” being played out. I feel like this statement is so cliché that the only time someone use it is when there is a complete and utter lack of beauty. I would say for the most part beauty exists subjectively, but in instances beauty somewhat exists subjectively. William Shakespeare was correct in saying that beauty lies, but I don’t think beauty lies all the time but there are most certainly instances were beauty is masking darkness or evil. The Birth of Venus by Adolphe-William Bouguereau is a prime example of lies that create beauty, as the fictional lifestyle depicted in the painting is quite beautiful. I disagree with John Keates because the truth is not always beautiful, there are many harsh realities in this world that are far from beautiful, in fact they are ugly. I especially liked Charles Baudelaire’s take on contemporary art because he encouraged artists to depict real life instead of creating false beauty. I side with Baudelaire because I like closer to about 90 percent realism and 10 percent romanticism. I feel this way because if beauty is found in truth then there is nothing to tarnish it’s value; but if beauty is found to be untruthful, the deceit involved negatively effects the appreciation of the beauty.

Reply
Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma
Aesthetics and beauty are two terms that are closely related when we talk about the appreciation of art. In terms of beauty, I believe people have there own interpretation of what it is and it’s always going to vary from person to person. I believe beauty exist subjectively in the mind of the perceived. With that being said, there could be certain things that I find beautiful and other people may think otherwise. What I believe is beauty is usually influenced by my personal beliefs, feelings and emotion. I need to find some type of personal connection to something in order to find beauty in it. However, there are some people that just look at something and they like how it looks and they consider it beautiful. They do not find no connection or anything and as long as it looks nice and pretty some may consider that certain object beautiful.

Reply
lizzystiller

Hey Janett
I had the same take on it in that people all have different opinions and believe different things are beautiful. What one person sees can be a completely different image than what another sees (take the black/blue and white/gold dress as an example). Our opinion is all based on how we were raised. Some people feel beauty is all physical while others see more into it. In the end it is hard to define beauty as everyone has their own definition.

Reply
amybecerraart

Amy Becerra

This weeks art discussion centered around “aesthetics and beauty”. The topic of beauty being subjective was one of the things discussed. I definitely think this is true because I believe that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” is a very true statement. Everyone finds different things beautiful. This can be because of culture, age, or just their own experiences growing up. I think that a lot of beauty is judged on how it looks superficially, however, a lot of beauty is also to be experienced for other reasons besides how something looks. This can go for many things: people, art, pets. The list goes on. Just because a piece of art doesn’t immediately grab your attention visually doesn’t mean that its not beautiful. There can be so much more to discover such as the reasons that piece was made, the emotion behind it, or the significance.

Reply
nkechiokoroma

Hey Amy,
I definitely agree with you when it comes to beauty being subjective. Even Hamlet and Keats had their own take on what beauty was. It is also pretty common to appreciate beauty, physically. I feel like physical features are more often than not, superficial. To really find beauty, someone must dig down deep through the surface to find it’s true significance.

Reply
Felix Huynh

I enjoyed the Realism vs Romanticism video, and I think that it does show a lot about what people think about the world around them and they themselves. Realism and people who call themselves realists seem to see the world in a much darker tone as opposed to romanticist, Though it is true that there are many romanticist plays that involve some tragic events, compared to realistic ideas they are seen as much lighter in tone with the use of personal glorification and a variety of references to nature and the world around. It was fun to watch the video, as I wanted to make sure what exactly a realist thought of the world so I looked it up. From what I could find, it seemed like realists had a very narrow idea of the world, thinking of one way, the “real” parts of the world are the only parts. It was interesting to see the different mindsets some people had compared to each other.

Reply
nkechiokoroma

Beauty is something we all appreciate. Whether it be artwork, nature, people, etc. It is also something that is very complex making it pretty difficult for everyone to interpret the same way. According to William Shakespeare in Hamlet Prince of Denmark, “O villlain, villain, smiling, damned villain!..That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain.” From here we can see that Hamlet may have thought his uncle had charm and grace, but once he figured out that he may have killed his father he figured that it was all a lie; his beauty was a lie. The portrait Birth of Venus is in fact a visually appealing, yet unrealistic.The Roman’s ideal female form of beauty seems to depict what people at the time wanted their women to look like instead of what they really looked like. Since the expectations doesn’t seem to match the reality and beauty is considered truth, I don’t think we can really call this painting truthful. With that in mind, we can see that beauty is sometimes deceitful. When we begin to appreciate something or someone’s physical features, we end up misinterpreting it for it’s beauty.

Reply
brianamgblog

I think the term aesthetics is the perfect example of what many people are saying; beauty is defined differently by different people. I see it every day when I scroll down my Instagram feed. It’s really cool to see how people can turn something so simple into something so beautiful. So this brings to me believe that the saying, “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”, is at least somewhat true. For example, someone with an “aesthetic eye” can look up at the clouds and see something others may not and snap a picture of it making it appealing. Some might call this imagination but it’s also one’s personal opinion on what they consider to be beautiful. After watching the video I got to talking with my friend and we started talking about art in general again. We go back to the overall idea that we’ve been focusing on all along: art can be anything. She said “art is relative” and I definitely agree with that. There’s so much that plays into and that includes beauty and aesthetics. It just all depends on the person. Like art, beauty cannot be defined.

Briana Garcia (1pm)

Reply
lizzystiller

Lizzy Stiller
What is beauty is a very hard question because I feel over time our definitions have warped. To me, I’ve always felt something is beautiful when it is pleasing to the eye. Using nice colors, soft lines, complementary patterns. However beauty is not always seen. Over the years growing up we realize everything and everyone has some sort of flaw. No one is perfect. And in that sense I like to believe that beauty is not perfect. Someone can have a heart of gold and that is beautiful. And we all have our own opinions. What’s beautiful to me may not be beautiful to you and that’s what’s so great. Because I feel in some way or another with all the different opinions out there, everyone finds everything beautiful.

Reply
Jessica Obrique

There is beauty in everything. Beauty in physical features, beauty in art, and even beauty in intelligence. To me I think that if someone were to define beauty it would be through their senses. We determine if something is beautiful by whether or not we feel it’s beautiful. That feeling is created through our sight, taste, feel, smell, or even hearing. I found the debate of whether beauty was the truth or a lie interesting. We see things everyday that our senses find beautiful but is it the truth? I can compare this to social media where people post pictures of themselves on Instagram. We see pictures that are “beautiful” but do they hold the truth? Many times pictures are altered to depict a perfect and “beautiful” image but we know it’s not an actual representation of themselves or their lives. I think that if something were to be truly beautiful it would show an unaltered truth.

Reply
Alfredo Gonzalez

Hi Jessica,

I agree with your approach on how beauty is defined. Each person has their own way of defining what is beautiful to them. Being in a world now where social media alters images by having different filters. I think many times people think of something is beautiful by the physical features instead of using all the senses you described. When we use the senses we have we really get to take in the true beauty in something that many see past it.

Reply
Zjlinney

Linney Sar

One definition of aesthetics in the video means “a set of principles concerned with the nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in art”. Relating this quote to “ Beauty is in the eye of the beholder…” is very vague it can either end a conversation or continue into a deeper conversation breaking down the topic of aesthetics and beauty. When I think about beauty I categorize this word in two groups as my personal standards and the significance of beauty and its impact. I can be materialistic with modern creation and approve of it beauty, but the word beauty for materialistic things are different when I compare it to artwork. The form of expression of an artist to be creative and using their skill on media is very significant. The way the artwork may look can affect my perspective when I interpret the artwork. If I can relate to the artwork and the concept of the artist objective to myself personally I can categorize it at beauty. The poem by John Keates, “beauty is truth” give a brief glimpse into artwork that define beauty. The artwork in the video depicts different ideas on personal experiences that express concern on the artist life events. If my personal emotion is involves with what I would paint it will effect what I define as beauty. If truth can be interpret from an artwork of experiences and emotions the beauty of the artwork is that it is relatable.

Reply
Alfredo Gonzalez

When it comes to beauty, each person would have a different interpretation to what beauty is and what they find beauty in something. Beauty for me is just not that aesthetics of something, but the thought and meaning behind it. There is a lot of things that I find beautiful and when I ask my friends about it, they do not agree with me. They are not wrong by saying a certain piece of art, or object is not beautiful but that is their way of saying what is beautiful and what is not. I feel my opinion on what is beautiful has changed over time as I have read and seen more different pieces of art as well learning more about the meanings behind certain things. With the video on realism, it is good to see art that showed how life was during those times. It is a representation of people lives, and it does not hold back on telling the truth.

Reply
adrianagmaciel

Adriana Maciel

Beauty is such a powerful term because there are a lot of versions of what people may find beautiful. There is beauty everywhere on this earth and everyone interprets and defines it based on their own senses and experiences it in a different way as anyone else would. I thought about the debate in the first video about beauty being the truth or a lie and I instantly thought about the way beauty is distorted in real life. For example, we look up to celebrities because society agrees that these people are beautiful and are on the covers of magazines. However, we do not realize how much those photos are photoshopped and altered so that they can look beautiful to us. I am not saying that these celebrities are not beautiful–but the standards for beauty are definitely altered therefore beauty in that sense is a lie. If the celebrities on the covers of magazines wore no makeup and their photos were raw and untouched, it would be the truth–and it would be more beautiful…but that’s not what we have been taught to recognize as beautiful. I personally believe that there is more beauty in the truth because it is raw, unaltered and real.

Reply
belenbarragan

Belen Barragan

Hi Adriana, I totally agree with everything that you’re saying. i don’t know if you’ve watched the Dove Evolution piece but I totally recommend it because it is proof of what you’re saying exactly. Another one that is really good is the Dove Real Beauty Sketches. And its true, truth is raw and unaltered and that makes it beautiful itself. I think beauty is constantly being altered by media. I think what is beautiful now might have not been beautiful 30 years ago or even 1000 years ago, and vice versa. I think that beauty is ever changing.

Reply
reynareal

Reyna Real
In this weeks art talk discussion I found it to be very interesting the video talked about aesthetics, beauty, realism, and romanticism. Both videos were very intriguing but the video that really caught my attention the most was the Realism and Romanticism video. Realism is my favorite because it shows a way to depict art for it’s true meaning. In the video it mentioned that “Beauty is truth” and I totally agree that beauty is truth. I feel like for the most part artist’s artwork is based on what they find most intriguing and it is usually the truth about they way they perceive the world.

Reply
meganchung07

Megan Chung

Hi Reyna. I found this weeks video very interesting as well. I really enjoy Realism art as well but I would have to say Romanticism is my favorite. I think that it focuses on idealism and it depicts idealistic scenes that can draw inspiration from the past. It allows artists to create art freely and make a piece that leaves room for interpretation. I think that “Beauty is truth” as well. An artists work can use to understand what the artists find interesting or capturing and the way they see the world

Reply
meganchung07

Megan Chung
I strongly believe that everybody has their own definition of beauty so there is no standard for it. People are allowed to think whatever they want about whether they think something is beautiful or not. But just like how everyone is allowed to think whatever they want, an artist has the freedom to create whatever they like. In the beginning of the year, I remember the professor talking about how the class went to some art museum. I do not remember exactly what the art piece was but a student looked at the letters that were created for fallen soldiers and started tearing up because he/she was so moved. Few moments later, another student looked at the same piece and did not get it and was not very amused by it. This shows how relative art can be.

Reply
Zack Ngov

Megan ,

I also think that everybody has their own definition of beauty. There is no standard for it, but everyone has their own standards. I think we can agree that a lot of people have similar standards, though. I think that these days, it is a matter of majority. If more people think something/someone is beautiful than not, then they/it will be rated beautiful. If one person likes an upcoming artist’s art piece, but ten people don’t, I think it would be fair to say that the artist needs to change their style.

Reply
Henry Pham

Hi Megan, I was interested in how you said that there’s no standard for beauty. I sort of agree with that and would like to add on to it. For society there seems to be a very loose standard for beauty. Many of us look up to these models, bodybuilders, actors, and more and find them beautiful. However, beauty is not exclusive for just people and is different for everyone. What we find beautiful depends on our exposure, such as who we grew up with and where, along with our knowledge, such as our major and passions. A person who loves motorcycles will find them beautiful whereas many people would not.
\

Reply
belenbarragan

Belen Barragan

I think it is so great that the Dove Evolution piece is included in the talk about beauty. I love Dove’s campaign for beauty. As mentioned in the video, one of the various definitions of beauty as stated by various artists and philosophers is that “beauty is truth”. I might alter this a little bit by saying that “there is beauty in truth”. I don’t believe that just because something is honest and truthful means it is beautiful. Like stated in the video I believe that the romantic painting of homelessness is beautiful and I would consider it more beautiful than one that depicted a harsh reality. Not saying the harsh reality portrait would not be beautiful, but unfortunately I think its easier to ignore the beauty in the truth than romanticized beauty. I rewatched the Dove Evolution piece and I think its a perfect example. I believe that the woman in the beginning, without being unedited in any way is beautiful. Do I believe that the romanticized version of her with makeup and alterations is more beautiful? Yes I do. Bottom line, I don’t think that truth means beauty or beauty means truth. I think beauty is found in both reality and a romanticized reality simply because beauty when romanticized is easier to find.

Reply
superyessi

Yesenia Hernandez

I agree I love the Dove campaign because it is so real. The beauty industry nowadays is very romanticized and idealistic, which is problematic because it is not representational. This lack of representation creates a lot of body issues. Although, romanticism is a fun thought when it comes to certain issues it is best to be realistic. The homeless issue, yes it nicer to see a romantic notion of it but that does not solve the horrors of homelessness. By romanticizing it you are only perpetuating the issue.

Reply
reynareal

Reyna Real
Hi Alfredo Gonzalez
I totally agree that when it comes to beauty each person has a different interpretation to what beauty is and what they find beauty in something. Beauty does come in many different meanings most of these meaning are based on the person individually. I also believe that what someone finds “beauty” is based on their view, ideals and experiences are. We are all different and I find it amazing that we all have different definitions of what is beauty.

Reply
Zack Ngov

It is always fun to learn about the differences between Romanticism and Realism. Romanticism is about making things better than they are and making them more appealing. Realism is about demonstrating the truth, even if it is harsh or not easy on the eyes. What I found weird is that in the realists paintings, the depictions seem like they are even uglier than what would be reality. Like in Les Demoiselles D’avignon, the head and body shapes are unrealistic and not natural. The same can be said for De Kooning’s Woman with Bicycle; the painting is not realistic.Overall, in relation to art, I think the Romanticism vs. Realism is mainly just about the different styles of art. At the end of it all, the painters are just trying to make their painting look interesting whether it be by painting things to be harsher than reality, or paintings things to be more beautiful than reality. I think the romanticists and realists both agreed that reality is boring to look at. I feel that people tend to over- analyze things. When Zucman says how can truth be beauty if there is no truth in the beauty of this painting, it shows that there are a lot loopholes to the subject. Regardless, it was great to see the major contrasts in the paintings of the two periods and the analytics behind them.

Reply
Emily Tomasello - Art

Emily Tomasello
One of the definitions for “Realism” given in this video was “the attitude or practice of accepting the situation as it is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly.” In contrast, a definition for “Romanticism” was “a reaction against the order and restraint of classicism and neo-classicisism and a reaction of the rationalism that characterized the Enlightenment.” I really enjoyed that quote from “Man of la Mancha” that read, “Perhaps to be too practical is madness. To surrender dreams — this may be madness. To seek treasure where there is only trash. Too much sanity may be madness — and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be!” Personally, I always thought that “Realism” involved portraying something how it is in real life, and then “Romanticism” involved portraying something better than how it is in real life. So if I had to set my dial between 0 (Realism) and 100 (Romanticism), I would definitely set it somewhere about halfway in between, so maybe like 45-55. I would want to look like myself of course, but I would kind of like to be just a tiny bit better than I actually am.

Reply
curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen
I really enjoyed reading the quote you provided “Perhaps to be too practical is madness. To surrender dreams — this may be madness. To seek treasure where there is only trash. Too much sanity may be madness — and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be!” I’ve never read it before and I love poetry. I’m excited now to explore more of the work surrounding romanticism and realism. I’ve always thought how it’s strange how humans will never know what it’s like to look through another person’s world. Every human projects the world differently and i think that is one of the most beautiful things to think about. So what if someone’s romanticism is dialed up to 90 but is only percieved as a 10 in another person’s eyes? Things I always think about…

Reply
Jose Perez

Jose Perez
The video for this week really had me thinking about the whole concept of beauty. To me, beauty can be defined many different ways, shapes, and sizes. Everyone sees the term beauty in different perspectives. For instance, one person might think something is beauty that I might not agree with, or vice versa. Also as stated in the video by several philosophers that “love is truth.” To me, I believe this is true because of the whole perspective concept. The person that might think something is beautiful that I don’t agree with, will believe the beauty they see is true because it is true to what they believe.

Reply
superyessi

Yesenia Hernandez

I would definitely place myself somewhere in the middle between realism and romanticism. I am a realist in situations but I love romantic movies. I could watch them all day long and live in the world these movies have created, but I know these are just movies. However, I think you need both romanticism and realism to create a balance within you. Romanticism can bring out the creativity and wonder of life, that reality sometimes takes away. As you stated romanticism is a reaction to the structure and oppression of society, romanticism is a great way to let your imagination be free. Romanticism creates a feeling. For example Wordsworth a key artist of the romanticism in England, he created many poems about nature and the power of it against modern life. Realism keeps you grounded and in art features everyday life. Paintings like Carraci’s The Butcher’s Shop depict the gruesome realities of animal cadavers and the meat industry.

Reply
Henry Pham

I really find it interesting that we’re talking about beauty today. In society we like to talk about beauty a lot. We will say that someone, a painting, or a building is beautiful. With those comes with opposing opinions and a lot of us like to beat the dead horse and say “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” whenever we like something that someone opposes. However, what exactly is beauty and what gauges how much beauty is in whatever we see? I believe that beauty is a measure of appreciation and in order to appreciate it, we need to have exposure and knowledge. With a model, we think they are beautiful because of our exposure to people around us and maybe, to some women, the knowledge of the skill of makeup. For an architect, his knowledge of building design makes him more appreciative of the beauty of buildings. On the other hand, a kid might not appreciate the beauty of it as much as the architect. In today’s world, there are many things that our society likes to think of as beautiful. Many younger people have the same concepts of beauty and that is perpetuated by our exposure to each other. We get out idea of beauty from each other due to exposure. After several years, after learning more and gaining more knowledge, their ideas of beauty change.

Reply
curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen
Some people like to look at art on the surface and analyze visually what they see. Others may like to interpret the meaning behind the visual aspect on the symbolic meaning of an art piece. Either way, I believe art will always be subjective. People bring in their own expertise when it come to their own opinion on something. I personally, would much rather interpret a painting on it’s symbolism. I like to understand the message behind an art and relate myself to that message. Romanticising i believe is an ability to enhance art work. It can be unhealthy if done to an extreme level, but to have the ability to romanticise something and make a person emote such a strong emotion I think is beautiful. Humans are capable of making something from materials and emote strong human emotions and that is powerful.

Reply
Marissa Sar

Hi Darryl!
I completely understand that art has has different interpretations, and it definitely varies on the person on what beauty is. There is also a personal level that art can resonated to a person. That is how the Realistic art makes me feel because it’s like I am actually there at that exact moment the artist is painting an event. It is amazing the creativity behind the human mind.

Reply
Marissa Sar

Marissa Sar

For the first video, I was pretty curious on the topic of Aesthetics. There is actually a difference with and without an “s.” With an “s” is a set of principles concerned with the nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in art. Aesthetic is concerned with the beauty or the appreciation of beauty. For my opinion on the concept of beauty, I actually thought it was based on the eye of the beholder. However, it’s mentioned that it’s such a washed-out statement. It was interesting that in John Keates’ artwork, he believed that “Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” that is all ye know on earth and all ye need to know. Versus, going back in year, William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, so it contrast Keates’ belief that beauty is truth, but was showcase that beauty lies. For the second video , the concepts of Realism and Romanticism aren’t completely new. However, it was a great reminder to learn the several definitions of those concepts. Realism is the attitude or practice of accepting a situation as it is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly; the summit was marked by a new mood of realism. The quality or fact of representing a person, thing, or situation accurately or in a way that is true to life
On the other hand, Romanticism is a movement in the arts and literature that originated in the late 18th century, emphasizing inspiration, subjectivity, and the primacy of the individual. Romanticism was a reaction against the order and restraint of classicism and neoclassicism and a rejection of the rationalism that characterized the Enlightenment. I would I like the Realism artwork because it makes me feel like I am a part of or actually witnessing a live event that happened at that moment. I just feel a connection or some sort of emotional reaction.

Reply
dschmitz137

Daniel Schmitz

Hi Marissa!

Yea I thought the definition thing was interesting too. I guess “aesthetic” just means having a sense of beauty, whereas “aesthetics” is the philosophy of what is considered beautiful.

The whole “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” reminded me of an old joke: If you have a bee in your hand, what do you have in your eye? Beauty, because beauty is in the eye of the bee-holder.

Anyway, I’ve always felt that Realism and Romanticism were two siblings that just never got along. Romanticism was the football star, straight A student that Realism never could be. So Realism became a rebel and did its own thing because it though Romanticism was too preppy and stupid. Realism thought he was just misunderstood.

Reply
chknalfredoart110

Alfredo Reyes
I found the videos very interesting as fro the first video talks about beauty in art and aesthetics which in my opinion beauty is defined as what certain people see it as themselves because everyone has their own opinion on what beauty is or not. I also found it interesting how John Keates talks about beauty is the truth and as for Hamlet tells us about beauty lies. As Glenn talks about the different paintings and whether or not beauty is a lie. As towards the second video Realism vs Romanticism is talked about more in the video as what is realism and romanticism. Romanticism is a movement in the arts and literature in the late 18th century. Also for realism is the attitude or practice of accepting a situation as it is and being prepared to deal with it accordingly.

Reply
Dabidlai

David Lai

Aesthetics come in a wide array of options considering it comes down to the people around us, and most importantly, us. Beauty and aesthetics should never be forgotten as opinions brought onto us by ourselves. It is never anybody’s right to tell us what we view as pleasing to the eye. .The Birth of Venus by Adolphe-William Bouguereau in this video can be deemed as beautiful to me, but not other people. I respect that everyone has different opinions. It is never right to intrude upon someone’s space just because we don’t see eye-to-eye on what is good and bad in the world. ‘Beauty is in the eye of the beholder’ is a saying exactly what I was saying about how perception varies from person to person, and that will never change. Everyone has an opinion on how they feel about a certain topic. Some people like to challenge opinions, and their opinions might be the reason there is ever a conflict with the freedom of expression or even opinion. However, the creation of society today can be amassed from the many opinions that have built up our communities. People should not be afraid to voice their opinion out of judgment from others. Trading differences in opinion as well as skills help better the community, not just ourselves.

On the topic of realism and romanticism in the video, it is hard to favor one over the other of the two. Realism is practical for the entrepreneurial mind and business aspects. Romanticism is more suited for the creative mind such as art and innovation. We live in a world where the combination of the two is almost immediately required to further our understanding of others. No two people are alike, but I feel like I am more in-tune with realism because of my particular interest in economics. I can understand how Romanticism and Realism were both a movement of literature and arts at a point in time because of their general beliefs and views in life.

Reply
dschmitz137

First of all, I’m going to start of by saying that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Just kidding. But I’m really going to say that beauty is objectively subjective. Or maybe it’s subjectively objective. Maybe. What I’m trying to say is that beauty is something that is objective (due to basic human nature/biology) but then also subjective because when you get to the little details, people always have different opinions.

All people (because they are all basically the same, to an extent, like their genetic information and instincts) will think the same certain things are beautiful. If you show a million people a picture of a barren field, and then a picture of a fertile forest, most people are going to say the forest is more beautiful. Why? Obviously because a fertile forest is a better place for a human than a barren field.

But at the same time, there will be great differences in the opinions of the flowers of the forest. Some people might enjoy blue flowers, some might like yellow, and other will like red flowers. Why? Because at that level of detail, it’s biologically unimportant. There’s no evolutionary selection when it comes to which color of flowers you might like.

Reply
samanthagomezblog

Samantha Gomez
It is interesting how this art talk video included Hamlet. Besides that I quite enjoyed this weeks art talk videos on the concept of beauty and aesthetics. Many of my fellow students made a good point about how, forgive me if i misinterpret this, do not appreciate natural beauty. What I mean by that is that we determine what is beautiful through our interactions with the world around us. Rather than come up with our own conscious thought, we submit to those of “society”. As for aesthetics, being the sort of “guidelines” for certain artistic items being classified as beautiful due to their “pleasing qualities”, it’s just another way of saying that beauty must or is confined to one set/specific box.

Reply

Leave a Reply