Art110-2016-Fall-banner

Schedule

Need Help?

  1. Ask online
  2. Come to before class OH on Wed 11:30-12:30 @Robek’s / Coffee Bean umbrella tables
  3. I can go to AS-120 (AS building is next to The Beach Hut, next to The Library) after class on Wed, at 3:45 and help anyone with anything.
  4. Make an appointment to meetup another time

Points on BeachBored

All points through Week 6 are now up on BeachBored. Be sure to check your points and know where you stand! So far we’ve had 321 points possible. Here’s how many points you should have to be on track for each grade level, and how many peeps in 1p / 2:30 are currently at each grade level:

A = 289 points – 56 / 47
B = 257 points – 5 / 4
C = 225 points – 2 / 5
D = 193 points – 0 / 0
F = 192 points – 2 / 6

  • 1p GPA = 3.74
  • 2:30 GPA = 3.39

Leaderboard

Top 5 @1pm:

  1. Stephanie Arciva, 394
  2. Hannah Adams, 392
  3. Maritess Anne Inieto, 376
  4. Joy Elizabeth Uba, 366
  5. Carlos Villicana, 362

Top 5 @2:30:

  1. Nathan Davalos, 444
  2. Lydia Chang, 441
  3. Jamie Van, 396
  4. Yesenia Hernandez, 395
  5. Adriana Maciel, 373

Your Websites

You’ve all managed to use your sites to post your weekly activities – awesome!

And a few of you have really started to add elements or design or organization to make your site really useful to you. As I’ve said before, “turning in your homework” is only the secondary use for these sites. I honestly hope you’ll use them long after Art110 is over. A career ePortfolio, or site for your band, small business, health & lifestyle blog, etc, etc, can really boost your connections. Whether you want to impress that HR director, lure in new clients, or express your growing expertise in an area, you site can be a powerful ally.

Here’s a few examples of sites that are developing nicely:

screen cap of Amy Becerra's website home page featuring an "About Me" box in the sidebar with a Snapchat selfie and bio text

Amy Becerra

Check out the great “About Me” sidebar widget on Amy Becerra‘s website! It’s often hard to even know where you are or who the author is with some sites. I love that Amy put her pix & mini-bio right on the home page, boldly claiming her website as her own. Over time this content can change as she’s looking for a Robotics gig, showing off her Rock Journalism, or talking about Cats.

screen cap of Emily Tomasello's home page using the WordPress.com "Dyad" theme

Emily Tomasello

And check out how great Emily Tomasello‘s site is looking with the Dyad Theme!

Check out Amy & Emily’s sites and think about making your site more yours!

photo of the Downtown Santa Ana 1st Saturday Artwalk

Nathan Davalos

Downtown Santa Ana Artwalk

Check out Nathan Davalos‘ cool post ‘n pix from October’s 1st Saturday of the month Artwalk in Downtown Santa Ana!

Photo overlooking The Brewery campus

The Brewery / Downtown LA

EC: Brewery Art Walk

22-23 October, 11am – 6pm
breweryartwalk.com

Speaking of Artwalks, a big one is coming up. The Brewery is a former Pabst Blue Ribbon beer brewery that’s been converted into a giant artist live-work loft space. Hundreds of artists have spaces there and about 150 or so will open their studios for the artwalk weekend.

Extra Credit:

  • Visit studios
  • Chat with artists
  • Take selfie w artist
  • Write a thoughtful paragraph about their work
  • Blog it
  • 5 points EC / artist
  • Up to 10 artists, so up to 50 points EC

What Week is this anyway?

A surprising number of you are using the wrong Week #’s on your posts. I haven’t started taking points off for this, or not giving credit, but please get the week right.

This week, right now, Monday 3 Oct – Sunday 9 Oct, is Week Seven! Please use the correct Week number in your posts! TY! 😀

Wk 7 – This Week!

  • Art Talk Discussionat the bottom of this post
  • Activitynone this week
  • Artist Conversation@SOA Galleries
  • Classmate Conversation@SOA GalleriesDifferent format this week! See below!
CSULB Art 110 Students taking a selfie

Classmate Conversation Wk 7

We’re mixing up the way we do the Classmate Conversation a bit this week! I’m going to ask you to do two Classmate Conversations this week, but you only have to turn them in at the galleriesno Classmate Conversation blog post required this week!

Classmate Conversation #1
As usual, find any classmate you haven’t met yet. Have a conversation about life & stuff. Try to learn something real about them. Ask each other the 1st Question OTW from Lourdes:

What do you struggle with the most and why? Evaluating or analyzing art? Interpreting it? Or relating to it?

You might look at some of the art at the galleries together. You could optionally do an artist interview together. Finally, draw your ID cards together – make them connect horizontally or vertically as 1 big drawing. When you’re ready, find me in the gallery coutyard, turn in your cards together and tell me something interesting about your partner.

Classmate Conversation #2
After you and your partner give me your ID cards, then together find another pair you don’t know (or don’t know at least 1 of) to make a new group of 4. Introduce each other to the new peeps. So if the 1st group is Justin & Lourdes, and they meetup with Savannah & Jonathan, then Justin will tell Savannah & Jonathan about Lourdes, and Lourdes will tell them about Justin, and so on. You can look at some art as a group, or do an artist conversation as a group, and ask the group the 2nd Question OTW from Justin:

Calligraphy is an underappreciated form of art today. The artistic writing declined ever since the printing press was invented. Do you still think Calligraphy is significant in today? If so, where or how could you apply Calligraphy in the modern printing world?

Finally, draw another group ID Card together! A 2×2 grid to make 1 big picture. Or 4 cards across or 4 cards vertically, whatever you like. When you’re ready, find me in the gallery coutyard, turn in your cards together and tell me something interesting about your group.

Yes, each person will be drawing & turning in a total of 2 ID cards this week. (Unless your name is “Hannah” or “Lydia” in which case, of course, you’ll still have to do your normal card for a total of 3! #priceOfFame )

And then you’re done! Video OTW Discussion & Artist Conversation blog as usual, but no Classmate Conversation blog post required!

Make sense?

Shout if you have questions!

Want to write next week’s Classmate Question OTW? Do it here: Classmate Question OTW

CSULB Art 110 Students taking a selfie

Zines & Flip Books

Lots of nice work last week with your Zines & Flip Books! Here are a few samples:

photo of a zine page as described in the text

Adriana Maciel

I drew some roses on the cover and on some of the pages and they were pretty but then I had flashbacks to biochemistry and that we learned about the mechanisms of photosynthesis and decided to include that in my zine too because it relates to flowers. For my major, we really don’t focus on plants in general (and I always disliked learning about plants too) but I randomly remembered the pathway from which plants convert sunlight into ATP, which is used for energy and powering subsequent pathways.

Adriana Maciel

photo of a zine page as described in the text above

Adriana Maciel

Claudia Sanchez holding a small zine she made called "Established '88"

Claudia Sanchez

I titled my Zine “Established 88” which is my birth year. Then I had a recipe to make Piña coladas. Followed by a colorful array of checkered boxes, a sketch of a city view, a page of math equations, the alphabet falling from the top to bottom, a love quote, an insert of my jury duty summons and finally a note that read “No ponies were harmed in the making of this product” on a my little pony backdrop.

Claudia Sanchez

photo of Emily Tomasello's "Studio 54" zine, as described in the text below

Emily Tomasello

I am a fashion student. I have just been so fascinated and mesmerized by the glitz, glamour, intensity and fashion that surrounded Studio 54. This week, I decided I would dedicate my zine to Studio 54 and use it as an inspiration book.

Studio 54 was the most legendary nightclub of the disco-era. In the late seventies, Studio 54 was probably the coolest place on Earth. It was started by socialites and entrepreneurs, Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager, and was located at 254 West 54th Street in Manhattan. Regular visitors included Elizabeth Taylor, Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, Michael Jackson, Calvin Klein, Truman Capote, Cher, John Travolta, Tina Turner, Elton John and Salvador Dali, to name but a few.

I had already made a board on Pinterest of some of my favorite Studio 54 pictures, so I had a pretty good idea of where to start. Once I chose my pictures and found some cool graphics, I printed them out and wrote down some quotes from articles, as well as phrases or facts that I thought were interesting or related to the picture they were next to. I hole-punched my papers and decided that I didn’t want to use plain old thread or yarn to tie my zine together. I had some old headphones that stopped working, and I figured that would be a pretty unique way to tie this up. Studio 54 is synonymous with disco, so I wanted people to see the headphones, travel back to 1977 and imagine they’re listening to some Donna Summer or Bee Gees tunes.

Overall I had a really cool time making this zine. I enjoyed it because I felt like I could really show what inspired me. If I were to do this project again however, I think I would type the words and print them out rather than write them myself because I hate my handwriting. I would also try to find a better way to secure the headphones because they were kind of loose even after I knotted them in the back of the zine.

Emily Tomasello

photo of a "Studio 54" zine by Emily Tomasello, as described in the text above

Emily Tomasello

original anime character illustration by Lydia Chang

Lydia Chang

I thought, “let’s just draw old OC (original characters) and see how that goes.” So, I opened up sticky notes on my computer and made a list of all the ones I wanted to draw.

This child is Ryuhan Jang. I think I made this child last year(?) when I was trying to draw fanart but it turned out bad and turned into him. LOL (omg he was an accidental baby) Brian chose purple to be the background, so I painted that and double traced the boy with a 08 Sakura Pigma graphic pen (I got a pack as a Christmas present & it’s saved my life so many times).

Lydia Chang

original anime character illustration by Lydia Chang

Lydia Chang

zine featuring illustrations of food with angry faces on them

Nathan Davalos

The idea of “hAngry” came to mind because I was getting frustrated when my girlfriend and I could not pick somewhere where to eat. All the foods that I illustrated in my zine were foods that we discussed when trying to make a choice. We ended up going to El Pollo Loco (so I guess you can say that we settled with tacos.) My favorite part of the whole process was drawing all the foods and adding angry faces. I have always enjoyed drawing and especially drawing cartoons.

Nathan Davalos

zine with pencil illustration of a figure working out equations on a white board

Raul Silva

In high school I enjoyed drawing cartoon characters on the white board of my classes, most portraying a message or joke. I would spend a lot of time on some because I wanted them to look a very specific way, however for this zine I wanted it to be more spontaneous and more story driven instead of focusing on the art itself. I marvel at the entrepreneurs and leaders that can make things happen. Working day and night and never stopping to make our lives better. Being successful can have many meanings and varies from person to person. This zine represents the way that I view success, having the passion to work hard and reach a position of leadership and wealth by making other peoples lives better, striving to make yourself better than yesterday and having a positive impact in your community.

Raul Silva

zine with pencil illustration of people riding different types of bicycles

Raul Silva

small zine with the title "To the jack asses at work"

Stephanie Valdivia

This zine was meant to be a sort of open letter to some of my coworkers. As I am learning more from wonderful, insightful, cultural classes, I am becoming more aware. I’m becoming aware of all the comments and demeaning behavior of others. I’m too aware and it’s impossible to unsee. I hear hundreds of microaggressions everyday from my coworkers towards me because I’m a girl. I see the way the men gather and gawk as a pretty girl walks into the store. I hear the way someone spits hate towards Black people because someone who was Black didn’t tip him once.

Jane Weibel’s exhibition last week actually gave me the sort of idea on what to make this zine about! I was really close to one of my coworkers and I saw him as a best friend even. It was only then after his fifth fucked up thing that I realized I was friends with someone who rejected all of my identities. He told me how he didn’t think gay couples should be able to adopt kids because they could force their “gay ways,” whatever that fucking means, how anyone who does drugs is stupid, a girl is at fault if she’s raped, and countless other ridiculous things. I’ve had enough and this zine was a way for me to release. I can only have so much patience at work.

Stephanie Valdivia

zine illustration of a silhouette figure complaining about "music today"

Stephanie Valdivia

watercolor zine illustration with the text "people are born"

Amy Song

For my zine I decided to illustrate a story I had read about why dogs do not live as long. The story is about a family dog who had to be put down and the 4 year old child in the family explaining why dogs don’t live as long. The child said people are born so that they can learn how to live a good life but dogs already know how to do that so they don’t live as long.

Amy Song

animated gif of a pacman game moment as drawn for a flip book

Andy Bui

To me, this idea was a great balance because the characters are not difficult to draw and it is interesting because a lot of us grew up playing Pac-Man, so it brings back some good memories. Originally I wanted to draw a track and field runner doing a long jump into a sand pit, which I used to do in high school, but I wasn’t able to achieve the action of running too well yet. I would definitely do this again with something possibly a little more interesting and challenging.

Andy Bui

spread of a hand drawn zine by Cindy Le

Cindy Le

“What does it mean to be human?” was a question that popped up in a fictional story I read a while back. It was a typical fantasy novel that looks at the relationships between those we considered monsters and those we consider to be human. I used this question to refer to reoccurring sentences that were said to me when I was growing from a small kid to the young adult I am today. The seventh picture was supposed to be a solitary picture of how I saw myself. But then I soon added a door. I wasn’t satisfied by how plain it looked, so I erased that door to draw an open door instead. Now the open door has people peeking from inside the door. The drawing progressed to symbolize the concept of a person having the power to pick whatever path they chose to follow, and where each door holds some kind of idea behind them. The door I picked would symbolize change, a change within myself because of the support I have from my friends today. The last two pages don’t have a message, but they were also things that related to me, ideas that made me who I am today.

Cindy Le

Hannah Adams holding her zine "Dinosaurs & Daily Life"

Hannah Adams

As soon as I heard there was an option to make zines I came up with many ideas. I thought of comics, and Halloween themes, and so many others. Eventually I settled on dinosaurs. I have been in love with dinosaurs my whole life. My mother always groaned when my birthday would come around, because I would inevitably ask for a dinosaur themed party, which she always gave me for 12 long years. I like to include a little humor in my works, so for my book, I made scenes as if dinosaurs had never gone extinct, and as if they lived their lives like any ordinary citizen. It was a really fun project. What I love about zines is how easy they are to make. But they have room for so much creativity. They don’t have to have words, just pictures. And they can still be a complete work. I will certainly enjoy working with zines in the future.

Hannah Adams

zine illustration of a flying dinosaur working for a package delivery service

Hannah Adams

flipbook animation of a man walking

Janis Vernier

I decided to draw a flipbook with little walking-cycle. The last years I did a lot of computer-generated animations, and it was really nice to do some hand-drawn frame by frame animation again. It always feels like magic when static drawings suddenly come to life.

Janis Vernier

This week’s art activity was to create a flip book. It had been a long time since I had even attempted to make one of these but in creating this one it really made me happy. It has the same sort of sense of a movie but with a lot less preparation, people, and budget. You can make your own movie fairly quickly and easily using the flip book method.

I think the most difficult thing was coming up with the story. Because I had sewn together my flip book in class, I had already set the number of pages I could work with, without having the story I wanted to draw out. This make more a bit of a challenge to make a story fit in the space but with enough thought, I was able to come up with one. Although this was the most difficult part for me, it was also the most fun. This type of art is simple but because of this simplicity it allows itself to be accessible to many.

Marcelo Ceballos

The process of creating my flip book consisted of paper from my sketch book. Before starting on my flip book, I did a handful of sketches that I wanted to incorporate in my flip book. Overall, I had a lot of fun creating my flip book. This activity taught me that you don’t need to know how to draw in order to create something.

Melissa Rios

cover of Monique Alcala's zine "Hoe Confidential"

Monique Alcala

I wanted my zine to represent myself and things I believe in so I went with a feminist themed zine. Starting with the title I wanted to name it something funny and clever so I went with “Hoe Confidential.” Recently my friends and I have been discussing slut shaming and talking about how much we hate seeing women putting each other down or judging based on their sex lives so we try to encourage other women to use the word “hoe” as a term of endearment.

Monique Alcala

zine illustration of a cell phone with the text "your next heartbreak is calling"

Monique Alcala

I decided to draw a flower sprouting from the ground in beautiful sunlight and slowly withering away as the sun goes away. I decided to draw this because it really portrays the importance of just taking a breather in your life and taking the time to relax and enjoy the nature that’s available to us. As students and working individuals our daily lives are always so hectic and full with environmental stress. We don’t often get a chance to just sit down and enjoy our surroundings. Before we know it the beauty that grew is no longer there to be looked at.

Tina Tran

Art Talk OTW

  1. 3 Million Years of Art History
  2. Joseph DeLappe
  3. Mahsa Soroudi
  4. The Mind in the Cave
  5. Graffiti Writing: Bomb It
  6. Classical Greece & Rome
  7. Renaissance & Baroque

We’re leapfrogging over The Middle Ages this week, and heading straight to Renaissance & Baroque. Just in case you want to think about The Middle Ages, the video is here, otherwise, on to the huge cultural rebirth of The Renaissance!

BTW: if you want to play with the Art History Timeline that you see me using in these talks, you can get your very own copy & the Freemind software to view, modify, or make your own, here:

Written by Glenn Zucman

BA, Psychology, University of Hawaii, MFA, Intermedia Art, Long Beach State. Host of American Public Media's "Border Patrol." Host of KBeach Radio's "Strange Angels." Interested in Identity Art that explores our Oracle-at-Delphi-like straddling of corporeal and virtual realms in our new media century. Civil rights in online space. 10 years...
Read more

96 Comments

Nathan Davalos

Nathan Davalos
The Renaissance and Boroque are both eras that I did not know much about. After watching the video I realized that I actually did know a little something about these eras. Some big names like Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Bernini are all names that I recognized when watching the video. I was unaware that some of the most famous and significant sculptures and paintings were from the Renaissance and Boroque eras. I am familiar with the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and arguably the most famous painting of all the “Mona Lisa.”After watching the video I went onto google so that I could get a closer look at some of these sculptures and paintings, I was amazed on the amount of detail that was put into these sculptures. Recently while watching a couple episodes of Spongebob, the episode where Spongebob wanted to become an artist came on. He made a beautiful sculpture with one hit onto the big piece of marble. This does not have to do with the video that we all just watched but I just wanted to bring that up because this reminded me of that episode.

Reply
meganchung07

I thought it was cool that I too was also able to recognize some of the names. I got the chance to see some sculptures in real life when I was traveling. There is a LOT of detail put into the sculptures and it was really interesting to see that. It almost looked like a person that was just dipped into plaster.
That’s really funny how you brought up an episode of Spongebob that you watched. I know the exact episode that you’re talking about haha

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Hi Nathan,
I also didnt known much about the Renaissance or the Boroque era, but then once I saw the names Michelangelo and Da Vinci as well, I knew of them and there artwork a little bit as well! I never really knew about where that sculpture was from in Spongebob too, then I just remembered when I saw it. It’s really interesting to know that they try to incorporate that era into something we see everyday too!

Reply
megansalinas11

Megan Salinas
Hey Nathan, I totally agree with you and how their names became a lot more familiar after seeing their pieces and hearing some of their stories. I, too, researched these pieces and looked at the detail that came within these pieces and it’s quite spectacular. The amount of detail and precision that the pieces have is insane, in that the average person wouldn’t see the detail put in, unless having a specific reason to look for it. So me, the average person, would have never thought to look at the precision put into these paintings, but for this particular assignment I did and I was really blown away.

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amazeeana23

Hello Nathan, I agree, before watching the video I didn’t know very much on the subject, but names like Da Vinci and Michaelangelo that are thrown around always carry weight with them seeing how they’re household staples. The pieces themselves that these artists were able to produce were absolutely stunning.

Reply
samanthagomezblog

Hi Nathan,
I found it funny that something such as a child program, Spongebob, would incorporate art that would trigger a memory of a certain art style. Nevertheless, I am not making fun of you. I agree with you and several other about how much detail and work goes into these pieces that many of do not realize today. Take the example of the sistine chapel ceiling , it is an amazingly beautiful piece of art that took a vast amount of time for the artist (Michelangelo) to be laying on his back layering up the paint.

Reply
meganchung07

Megan Chung
I always seem to get the eras confused when it comes to art. By looking at the timeline, it made it easier for me to visualized the artwork from each time. A lot of the names were very familiar to me while watching the video like Michelangelo and Da Vinci. It was interesting to see how Bernini and Michelangelo both created a sculpture of David but people had different preferences depending on the question asked.
I purchased a fragrance called Fragonard from Paris and I was curious to see if it related to the painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard. It was very interesting to find that the perfume smelled very floral/earthy and that a lot of Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s art was of an elegant girl standing in a forest area surrounded by flowers.
Is it related? I don’t know but it’s very likely and i’d like to think so

Reply
Nathan Davalos

It is funny that you say that you get confused with the eras when it comes to art because I seem to have the same issue overtime we do an art talk on the timeline. It is also crazy how everything is connected, from a fragrance being created based on an artists work. From last weeks art talk, we saw that the many building and famous monuments are made after those from the Classical Ages of Greece and Rome. The timeline really helps with getting to know the order in which the eras occurred.

Reply
beentiredblog

Kayla Tafoya Sablan

I agree, Megan. It is really confused to get the eras of art down and recognizing what distinguishes one from the other so the video was definitely helpful and pretty interesting. I thought the little story about Glenn’s previous class’s reaction to the David sculptures. Surprisingly, I agreed with what the class had said. The Michelangelo sculpture was a lot more appealing to me because I felt there was a lot more detail. Bernini’s sculpture was just a little more physically attractive to me, ha ha. Overall, these artist did really beautiful work. It’s been difficult to remember that this type of art is still timeless and worth appreciating still when there’s been so many more forms of art being discovered and transforming nowadays.

Reply
Fatima Negrete

I agree with you Megan when you said that the artists name were familiar to you. For instance, some artists that I am familiar with are Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. I knew these artists when I was in elementary school because I noticed that it was similar to the names of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (except for Donatello) unless there is an artist whose name is that, but I am not aware of, perhaps.

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Daniel Martinez

Hello Megan,
I completely agree with you when it comes to the art timeline and how it can be very confusing. I also agree with you with the fact that both sculptors Michelangelo and Bernini both sculpted a statue of David, yet Michelangelo’s statue of David, to most people’s eyes, resemble more art. Overall, both artists’ work are very inspirational and beautiful to watch.

Reply
Emily Tomasello - Art

Hi Megan!
The timelines we have seen in these videos really help me out a lot, too, especially this week when we were discussing the Renaissance. I had previously touched on these topics when I was in middle school and high school, especially when I went to Catholic school. So a lot of these names and pieces of artwork were familiar to me. One of the most interesting things that I learned this week was that both Michelangelo and Bernini had sculpted different versions of David. I think that is why art is so powerful because two artists can have the same model in mind but then create this model in two separate and unique ways.

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Gian Lorenzo Bernini was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and a theater designer. He created the Baroque style of sculpture and many other artwork as well. He is very well known for his life-size Baroque marble sculpture, “Apollo and Daphne,” which he worked on for about 3 years, as well as with other artists and finished in 1625. This sculpture really caught my eye when I was researching about him and his work. It was inspired from Ovid’s Metamorphosis, which was the myth story about how Apollo fell madly in love with Daphne even though she was devoted to someone else. It was very impressive how Bernini did it in such detail and the fact that he was on 25 when he created it. Also, during the making of Apollo and Daphne, he stopped working on it to create his other well known sculpture, “David.”

Reply
Jamie Van

Jamie Van
Hi Tiffany,
I also found an interest in the artist, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. After hearing him mentioned, I looked up his work. I saw his work as a painter, architect, and a theater designer and found it all really fascinating with all of the classical feels. I really admired his work on Cornaro Chapel within the Santa Maria della Vittoria in Rome. Furthermore, I thought that the way that he intertwined mythology along with his sculpturing work, particularly the one titled “Apollo and Daphne” like the one you mentioned was inspiring because it demonstrated a sense of history and depth to the piece. With the plot of Apollo’s hopeless love for Daphne, it caught my interest as I thought the sculpture reflected a beautiful love story. I’m a sucker for love so I really enjoy romantic stories. I thought that the story behind his work was really insightful and symbolic of the perspective of love for the time’s generation.

Reply
melissapassarelli

Tiffany Phan,

Gian Lorenzo Bernini is an interesting artist with many famous sculptures. I agree with you that the “Apollo and Daphne” sculpture is interesting and eye catching. As you mentioned, his sculpture “David” was being built while putting the “Apollo and Daphne” sculpture on hold. “David” is a sculpture of a pitcher to signify strength that is being put into it. In high Renaissance, the sculpture portrays movement and energy. Bernini’s goal was so that the audience can relate to “David” as an “image in our body instead of just our mind.”

Reply
megansalinas11

Megan Salinas
This was a time era where I didn’t think I knew much about; however, as the video continued I realized that I knew more than I thought before it started. The different artists that were mentioned like Leonardo Da Vinci and Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni were very popular artists, but as close-minded as it sounds, I didn’t necessarily know which art pieces were theirs. So seeing that the Mona Lisa was painted by Da Vinci and the sistine chapel ceiling painting was painted by Michelangelo, I became more aware. After coming to the realization that these particular paintings were by these famous painters and sculptures, different things that I have heard about art made a lot more sense.

Reply
adrianagmaciel

Adriana Maciel
I definitely agree with you, Megan, since I never really studied art or even became familiar with artists that I only know of famous artists like Da Vinci and Michelangelo. However, it was really cool to see that different artists followed each others work and did their own takes on people who were well-known at the time ie. David and Marie Antoinette. Having the timeline along with different work from a particular artist is definitely helpful and the organization of it all definitely simplifies the connections of artists throughout time.

Reply
Pamela Ajoste

Megan,

I also thought that I didn’t know much about this topic, but then I started hearing some familiar names such as, Michelangelo, DaVinci, and Bernini. I also have a hard time differentiating which artists created what, but this video definitely made it clear for me.

Reply
Juli Yoshinaga

Hi Megan,

I totally agree with you. I can recall many facts and names presented in the timeline video because I too, have learned this material in my school’s history classes. The famous artists such as, Da Vinci, Michaelangelo, Bernini, were touched upon in school and I appreciate learning about the art history and the evolution throughout the years. I definitely did not learn to appreciate the art as much as do now, but reflecting back, it was beneficial to have learned about the subject so I can learn about it in a broader and more specific way.

Reply
Fatima Negrete

Fatima Negrete-Farias
I am familiar with the Renaissance because I know a little about Da Vinci. For example, one of his well-known paintings is the Mona Lisa. I can’t believe that there was a movie about his work (The Da Vinci’s Code). When I was looking at the painting of Raphael’s girlfriend half naked I was like why? What was going on through his mind for him to paint that? Another amazing piece that is one of my favorite is the Sistine Chapel. I found the execution beautiful and the colors. When I see that painting, my mind is like in a wonderland. The only artist that I didn’t know is Bernini. But when I saw the sculpture of Teresa Halbach I couldn’t believe it was made out of marble. I wouldn’t be able to pull that shit off lol. I also did not know Rococo; I found his work amusing and beautiful because there was a guy who was trying to look up at the girls dress Swing.

Reply
Jamie Van

Jamie Van
As religion was very dominating during this time, people were slowly becoming more and more curious about exploring new perspectives. In regards to the Renaissance and the Baroque, the video covered a lot in a short span of time. Some of the moments in the video that I loved would be about the religious artworks, particularly that of the Cornaro Chapel within the Santa Maria della Vittoria in Rome. The artist, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, utilized a lot of white marble media, which gave it a really classy feel to it. The masterpiece was really central to the Roman Catholic church at that time. My family is mainly Catholic so it had a personal connection to me because it was more spiritual and I felt like the art spoke to me more after learning more about it.

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hrandonbong

Brandon Hong

Hey Jamie! Fancy meeting you here. I just wanted to say I totally agree with you. This video was actually my favorite video so far especially because of my Christian background. I love how these artists portray religion into their artworks, and they’re not judged by society about how offensive it can be. Da Vinci has always played a role in my life, and I think the most memorable painting to me is The Last Supper. The amount of detail he puts in to making that art work is just amazing. I even love all the conspiracy theories that go with Da Vinci and thinking about him reminds me of the book the Da Vinci Code. Anyways back on topic, like I said I felt like I had a connection to this video too because of my religious background and just wanted to share that with you.

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hrandonbong

Brandon Hong

Some big names like Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Bernini are all names that I recognized when watching the video. These famous artists especially Da Vinci have always piqued my interest. Da Vinci with his inventions and his so called secrets have always played a role in my life. Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is his most famous piece, but I always looked at his inventions more than anything; probably because of my engineering side. I’ve heard of baroque before, but I never really payed much attention to it. After watching this video I realized baroque styled art is what I do most in my drawing. It’s always interesting to learn something new, after all isn’t that what college is for?

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adrianagmaciel

Adriana Maciel
Every time I hear the term “Renaissance” I think about the Renaissance memes on the internet, they’re literally my favorite kinds of memes because some of the people in those paintings have really funny reactions–and people on the internet have a lot of fun with that….Anyways, ever since I was small, I had heard about the sculpture of David and it has been a dream for me to see the famous sculpture in person. I think sculptures of humans is so amazing because I know for a fact that there is no way I would be able to sculpt something so beautiful. However, I didn’t know that there were multiple sculptures of David by different artists which is pretty cool to know. My friend, Ariel, just posted a photo of the David sculpture because she took a trip to Europe and it made me even more excited to see it in real life one day as well. I wasn’t aware as to how many famous artists came from this era because there are just so many that I’ve heard of but having a timeline definitely helps with the visuals and making connections I just wished there were less clicking sounds in the videos they make me anxious/stress me out for some reason!

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nkechiokoroma

Hey Adriana!

I got to say, I also really do enjoy the Renaissance memes. Theres even an account on twitter that I follow that is dedicated to posting them lol! But anyway, I will also admit that I didn’t know about the multiple David sculptures. It kind of reminds me of the Raphael painting of his girlfriend and how many Auguste and Sherman had their own interpretations on the piece. It is crazy to see how different, or similar, someone can interpret someone’s work. I guess art really is subjective!

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leslie2213

Hi Adriana,
I have not seen any Renaissance memes, maybe i should look some up. Oh, never mind i have seen them.I love the different face expressions many artists have. While watching the video i did not know that there was different sculptors of David. I never thought that they all had a different influences on each artist. I agree with you on how art is really subjective. After seeing so many forms of art i realize how practically anything can be considered art.
– Leslie Meza

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nkechiokoroma

This week was all about the Renaissance. It was interesting to see how artist influence other artist works. An example wold be how Raphael’s painting of his girlfriend influenced the work of Jean-Auguste as well as Cindy Sherman. Even though their paintings were very unique, they all traced back to the La Fornarina painting. The comparisons and interpretations done by different artists was also very interesting. The way Bernini interprets Saint Teresa’s visions and the portrait of Saint Teresa done by Peter Paul Rubens just goes to show the different kind of directions these artists wanted to go in order to present their work. Some being very simplistic yet realistic while others being a lot more extravagant.

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beentiredblog

Kayla Tafoya Sablan

Wow. I really really loved Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s sculpture of St. Theresa. I can honestly say that taking a look at differences between Renaissance versus Baroque style of art, I feel a lot more attracted to the Baroque style. I think the use of shadows and lighting can make such a difference in how art is viewed. Literally. Lighting and shadows to me can make an art piece look completely different in various types of lighting. I feel like these tools set the mood for the art as well. They can change everything from the way we view it as more dark or uplifting, the richness or brightness of the colors used, etc. It’s really beautiful to me. The way the lighting hits the entire sculpture completes the entire look, and it sets a mood for the viewer. Renaissance is beautiful too, of course. But I’ve always enjoyed the use of dark colors and more serious pieces of art. Also, loved the recreation of LaFornarina by Raphael by Cindy Sherman.

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cslabell

Hey Kayla, yes thats such a beautiful sculpture. i think its so elaborate and detailed. when i see it it makes me feel not so much the emotions going on, but i think about the elements instead. i dont feel the emotions of fear and love or what other people would say. what i see is wind, chaos, and fire. i think her gown is what makes me feel all of this, its just so captivating, it looks like a wave, weird huh?! but i also agree with you when you speak about light, it definitely changes the outlook of a lot of things. it literally represents light and dark, good and evil, life and death. lighting has so much to do with our opinion of art. particularly here though i do think his lighting technique made it even more life like, im sure the lighting resembles life like atmospheres. i mean we even see how lighting is so important now; films, television and stage productions all have their own lighting department. we even take pictures and selfies often looking for the right lighting, so its definitely an important entity when i comes to art.
By:Claudia Sanchez

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curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen

Kayla, I too, love the manipulation of light and shadows. It happens to often that art goes overlooked. Art is made by anything and everything essentially. Regarding light and shadow, the different time of day portrays a different type of scenery, therefore it’s a different feel and a different perspective. I love that idea of constant change and different interpretations of art. Like you’ve mentioned, people can interpret things to be more uplifting or dark. That statement is true, sometimes people find comfort in the strangest places to others.

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Zjlinney

Hi Kayla,

What I learned from art in my earlier years in school I was only familiar with the Renaissance period. Which kinds of overshadow the Baroque style. Both style are unique in there own way. Seeing the artwork of Gian Lorenzo Bernini I really like the Baroque style and painting using this particular style. I am amazed at the exaggerated dramas that are painted giving the artwork a fun and innovative way of showing short story. Incorporating dark and light lighting to give the artwork a different feel.

-Linney Sar

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leslie2213

Leslie Meza
This video of the Renaissance & Baroque brought back so many memories from middle school. From learning about Da Vinchi and his painting of Mona Lisa to Michelangelo’s sculptor of “David.” One of my favorite parts about this video was when the sculptors of David were compared. The response that one of the girls from class gave was something i didn’t expect. However, i do agree with her in the choice of David just because he looks stronger and more brave. Another thing that caught my attention was how one painting influenced many artists. For example, the painting of Rafael’s girlfriend influenced others to later painting Cindy Sherman. I believe that as artists create new forms of art, many other artists are influenced and more art is created. Art is a never ending thing.

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Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma

Hi Leslie Meza,
The comparison of the sculptures of David was very interesting to me too. I agree that the sculpture of David created by Bernini would be more ideal as to who I would date. He does look like he’s more brave and stronger as oppose to the David created by Michelangelo because he looks more like a pretty boy that would only care about himself. At first when these two sculptures of David were compared I thought to myself why would there be a difference if they’re both David. However, then I realized that they are portrayed a little different in the way they look. The body compassion and face expression of the two sculptures are very different that make us assume they have a different personality.

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gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
I agree with Leslie, this video does bring back a lot of memories from middle school. Every year there would be a lesson at some point about the Renaissance. It actually really helped to have a background on Renaissance history. Like I remember seeing the Mona Lisa for the first time, and thinking to myself, why someone would draw a lady with one eyebrow. Yet through the years and learning more about Davinci I finally managed to get over the eyebrow.

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Jose Perez

Jose Perez
After watching this video, I felt the exact same way. This video did bring back many memories for grade school. When I was in high school, I took the opportunity to actually see these paintings in person. These paintings are marvelous and bring back so many memories after watching this video.

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Daniel Martinez

Daniel Martinez
The timeline really does help a lot when it comes to art. It is wonderful to see how many artists would devote so much time to make such beautiful piece of art. The David sculptures of Michelangelo and Bernini are amazing and they’re two very inspirational sculptures and artists. It was very nice to see how much they both achieved and all the success they got throughout their life. Aside from being artists, they were architects too. I always believe it takes a very creative mind to be an architect because every architect wants to be different, they don’t want the same piece showing up. They both accomplished great structural design features and it is something i admire them for. Michelangelo’s piece of the David sculpture is known worldwide, and it is one of the few art works that come to mind when people talk about art. It was amazing seeing work from these two great artists.

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giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

Hey Daniel, I agree that the sculptures of David are amazing and it was intriguing to see the alternative take that Bernini had on the sculpture. I personally like Bernini’s sculpture of David more than Michelangelo’s version. I also agree with you on it taking a brilliant and creative mind to be an architect. Both Michelangelo and Bernini showed a lot of their genius in there architectural works. I think Michelangelo’s brilliance was especially displayed in his painting on the Sistine Chapel ceiling as he had to not only create a beautiful painting, but also consider the architectural structure of the chapel. His ability to create this painting on such a unique structure is amazing.

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beansartblog

Arvan Arguelles

I definitely agree with your timeline statement, it clearly defines what happened in which time periods. Just like you, I loved Bernini’s work, especially his contribution for the Cornaro Chapel, which was the sculpture Ecstacy. You mentioned how their creativity helped them with creating their works are architects, in which I strongly agree on. These two thinkers used their ideas and creative minds as an advantage, in which helped shift art into another level during this time period.

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Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma

I really enjoyed watching this art history timeline on the Renaissance & Baroque time period. I learned about many artists that I didn’t even know existed. Each of their work is so unique and we can see that art is always influenced by art pieces from the past. The only artist that I really knew about was Leonardo da Vinci, particularly his piece of the Mona Lisa. I really like the sculpture Ecstasy of Saint Teresa from Gian Lorenzo Bernini. I went to look at more images of this sculpture to get a closer look. It so interesting to see that years later after this piece was created, Peter Paul Rubens then a different piece on Saint Teresa. In his piece he gave a better idea/look on what Saint Teresa is suppose to look. Petter Paul Rubens adds more color detail on the clothing of Saint Teresa as opposed in the sculpture of Bernini where she only has a white texture. Again, we see that influence that artist have on other artists.

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Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

Hello Janett,
I also learned a lot about artists that I did not know about. It just kind of makes me realize how there is so much out there that I do not know about. If I were to know these things though, I think I would be as appreciative as I am now after having watched this video. I did not even know that there was a time period called the baroque. I also think that Mona Lisa is a pretty famous painting that most people would know. Bernini’s sculptures were all very beautiful, especially the Saint Teresa one. I do not think Paul Rubens piece was better though, as they both are beautiful in their own ways. It is very evident in seeing how artists influence other artists though, just like our world today.

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amybecerraart

Amy Becerra

Hi! Like you, I also enjoyed this week’s art history timeline because I learned about artists I did not know before. I also only knew about Leonardo da Vinci’s painting, Mona Lisa. I thought it was interesting how that is such a well-known painting that we immediately know who painted it. The sculpture, “David”, however, is also popular and no one really knows who actually sculpted it. In my personal experience, I always saw the sculpture but never knew who actually created it. It’s weird how we always learn about Da Vince in school when learning about the Renaissance period but we never learn about the equally talented sculptor, Bernini.

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Jessica Obrique

I really enjoyed watching this video as well! There were some artists that I’ve known about before but I’m also happy to learn of some more new artists as well. Just as the the art of that period was influenced by the past. I think a lot of the art today is influenced by the Renaissance & Baroque period as well. There are some timeless pieces that are famous all around the world and it’s awesome we get to learn more about them again. The work in the Renaissance and Baroque period was so detailed and so intricate it truly was beautiful.

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cslabell

i remember through the years of education when it came to art the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo art form was the most frequently and elaborately taught. it always seemed that teachers and professors had a particular liking to this era, it also seemed to be the form that they would compare and contrast other eras, forms and styles to. i think this has to do with the fascination that people have to do with themselves. i hope that doesn’t sound bad or judgmental but i think there’s a lot of self image preference in this era. there are so many art pieces that are so life like that before weren’t as exact as these. i think that the first modern presence of vanity is evident here with so many self portrait and detailed paintings and sculptures. i think this is why its so prominent in education because it finally shows how lifelike something can come to the actual human being. but not to fully belittle this art form i do have to agree, i think the life like details are amazing. i particularly like the bodies of women because they seem real. woman, especially naked woman, paintings don’t seem to be a size 0, they seem to have more “jiggly parts” i think that is awesome. what seems to be perfect and flawless porcelain skin and bodies in Greek art, are now more free and voluptuous. i have always wanted to visit the Sistine Chapel and see Michelangelo’s amazing work. its definitely on my bucket list. its amazing that such a piece is still so important and leaves us i awe. i mean i look at pictures of it online and i forget the content meaning of the piece and just look at the details and its size and i get into this trans and just say WOW. i really hope to one day see it for myself. i also really like the Marie Antoinette style. have you ever seen the film version directed by Sophia Coppola with Kirsten Dunst? The cinematography and vibrant colors make me hope that thats really how it was. the bigness of dresses, wigs, fancy things makes it all look like a candy shop. if life was anything like “The Swing” by Fragonard in the Rococo period then my goodness how fantasy like. i know this was more for the elite and there was poverty for others but, my goodness life looks like a dream here. there was also a picture in the video of people viewing the Mona Lisa; this stood out to me very much. i just see people out with their phones and cameras and it just makes you form your own opinion about the times and peoples character. its like now we obviously live in an era where “if you don’t facebook/instagram/snapchat it, it didnt happen” and thats really sad. definitely seeing this art live would be a treat, but i wonder how many people who travel to see it in person who are so bombarded by other peoples accounts and pictures of it that when they see it they cant find their own appreciation for it and sadly say “thats it?”…..
By: Claudia Sanchez

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Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

The Renaissance was truly a time of art and enlightenment. It was a time where works of art such as the Mona Lisa and Sistine Chapel came to light. Famous artists that we still know today such as Michelangelo, Raphael, and Leonardo came out of this era as well. These artists have influenced the world of art so much that their works are still preserved to this day. Not only did paintings come out of the Renaissance Era, but amazing sculptures such as David also were produced. Sculptures and art like that would come to influence the Baroque Era as well, which was also a time where beautiful art was produced. One famous artist that came out of this era was Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Bernini was a sculptor and some of his famous works of art include the Ecstasy of St. Teresa and his own version of David which followed Michelangelo’s own. People may ask which version of David is better, but in my opinion I prefer Bernini’s David because I think it looks cooler. It is very evident how much of the Renaissance has influenced the rest of our world, whether it be in the past or today in the present. As it continues to influence us, the art of that time and of the Baroque will continue to be preserved and studied for a long time to come.

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Alfredo Gonzalez

Hey Mark,

I also believe the Renaissance was a great time for art, as artist and art pieces that are still well known now came during this time. The influence that came from the Renaissance is in many forms and I do not think many people realize it. I think the sculpture of David by Bernini is also a great one where he was able to make such a detailed piece while showing movement and not just having him standing like Michelangelo. It should get more praise for being a great piece and it is not one many people do know about. I also believe how the art from this will always be talked about and never forgotten about.

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melissapassarelli

Melissa Passarelli

I already knew some artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Gian Lorenzo Bernini that were mentioned in the video but I didn’t know much about their famous art except the Mona Lisa because it is a painting that I find really interesting. It contains a women who portrays as mysterious with a faint smile that captures individuals attention. The Mona Lisa is a portrait that has different meanings that have changed over time and inspires many people around the world. The Renaissance is a very important era for art because it has many artist and paintings that have influenced the world while inspiring as well.

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amybecerraart

This week’s art talk talked about Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Bernini was many things: a sculptor, painter, architect, and theater designer. He was most known for creating a style of sculpture called “Baroque”. Bernini made a life-size Baroque marble sculpture called “Apollo and Daphne” that he is very well known for. This suplture ook awhile to make (3 years) and was finished in 1623.When I saw this sculpture, I was amazed of all the detail. Marble is not something fluid, however, the two figures in the statue do not look stiff at all. There is a lot of graceful movement. It’s amazing how a sculpture can be made to look like it has this much movement when it is made of such a stuff substance. “Apollo and Daphe” was based on a mythological story of how Apollo, a god, fell in love with Daphne even though she was engaged with someone else. While researching Bernini’s other work, I also discovered he created more famous sculptures including “David”, “Ectasy of Saint Teresa”, “The Rape of Proserpina”, and “Chair of Saint Peter”.

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Valeria Gonzalez

Hi Amy,
I also researched some of Bernini’s work, but I did not look into them with as much depth as you did, so reading your comment was very educational. I also found his work to be very beautiful and expressive. It will always amaze me how sculptures are able to capture such detailed facial expressions using a rigid material like marble. I love Greek Mythology so it was great to see that he based so many of his works on Greek Mythology. Bernini’s work is definitely worth looking at.

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gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
When i hear the words Renaissance and Baroque, all i think about is the architecture and buildings, which is still art in my opinion, but i completely forget about the great artists of those times. Such as Davinci and Bernini among other artists. It is amazing the type of sculptures they were capable of creating in those time periods, and with less resources than we have now. To this day, i see images of art works like the Sistine chapel or other common known Renaissance art like the Mona Lisa, and i feel like there will never be anything as original as that Renaissance art. Simply the texture, and materials used like Marble, and the smooth finish these artists were able to get out of it, especially the detail and delicacy in the material and curves. There is no doubt their architecture and art has influenced modern day buildings and art

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Valeria Gonzalez

The Renaissance is the time period that comes to my mind when the word art is mentioned because there are so many artists and work of arts that I know at the top of my head. Michelangelo and Leonardo are usually the two artists that I know of the most, so it was interesting learning about Raphael. I especially found it really fascinating that artists throughout time have found inspiration on the painting he did of his girlfriend. I had actually never heard of Bernini so I googled some of his works. I found his work to be beautiful, but one particular piece of his work stood out to me because it honestly scared me. This particular piece is called Damned Soul and the facial expression on the man is terrifying to me. I would definitely run the other way if I ever saw this piece in a museum. On the contrary, the painting from the Baroque era are very colorful and inviting. I have seen many of this paintings before, but I did not know they belonged to the Baroque era. You learn something new everyday!

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Alfredo Gonzalez

When it comes to the Renaissance and Baroque, the only names I was familiar with was Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo di Lodovico. As a kid I would always learn in school and saw on tv about the Mona Lisa by Leonardo and the Sistine chapel and the statue of David by Michelangelo. These have been art pieces that I felt have influenced many art pieces over time and these pieces are the most well-known pieces worldwide. Over the summer I travelled to Italy and France and had the chance to see these beautiful art pieces. When I first saw the Mona Lisa it was breath taking as I never imagined seeing it in person. I was no able to get up close to it as it is behind a glass and it is roped off as well, but I was surprised to see how it is way smaller in person. When I saw the statue of David, I was surprised with this piece because it is way bigger than I expected. It is so detailed to how Michelangelo was able to capture every small detail from head to toe. Just to think this came from one big piece of marble and shaped into this statue was amazing. The Sistine chapel was another amazing piece of work to see in person. It is more spiritual to see this as when you step inside, there is a dress code to be inside the chapel as well as there is no talking or photography allowed. You really feel like you are back in time when it was first made when you are seeing all the art on the ceiling.

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Justin Pham

Justin Pham

Hey Alfredo,
I think it was cool how you were able to talk about your experience with the paintings of the era. I agree that the Mona Lisa is definitely one of the most influential pieces of art history. I’ve always wondered how people were able to make such intricate details in huge statues back in the old days, as they are very amazing and compelling. I hope to be able to visit some museums soon.

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giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

Many pieces from the Baroque and Renaissance Eras are very recognizable such as the Mona Lisa and the statue of David. When referring to the Renaissance we typically talk about Italy and the North which spans from the fifteenth to the sixteenth century. It was also the era where sensibility began to play a large factor in art, such as in Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man, which offers the idea that man is the measure of all things. It was interesting to see how influential Raphael’s LaFornarnia is, as several artists recreated it in their own work years later. Gian Lorenzo Bernini emulated many of Michaelangelo’s works such as his own sculpture of David. I think that Bernini’s sculpture of David is better because of how it portrays David in motion, giving his character strength and making the David seem more human. Bernini’s sculpture of David shows how the Baroque era is much more dramatic than the Renaissance as Professor Zucman pointed out. I actually enjoy the Baroque Era work more because of its dramatic nature.

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Justin Pham

Justin Pham

This week, we explored the Renaissance era and the influential artists of that time. It was very interesting to learn more about how the different artists held similar styles. I would always hear the name Michelangelo and Da Vinci as a kid so these were the names that stuck out to me during the video. It was cool to see these people mold art the way it is today. For example, the statue of David, everyone had their own interpretation of it and each era had different ways of portraying it. In my opinion, the Renaissance era is when art truly began to evolve and become more sophisticated and expressive.

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curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen
I don’t know much about the Renaissance Era, but I do know a little. The Renaissance era was the revival of classical learning and values of ancient Greek and Rome. New technology at the time helped influence what was defined as “Renaissance” art. Some of the few masters at the time were Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael. The Renaissance art tried to capture the natural mystery of the world. I find it quite amazing how art during the Renaissance era was even produced. The people were very creative with their resources and manipulated these materials to create masterpieces. It’s amazing. Personally, I don’t resonate with with the Renaissance style. I personally prefer the Romantic Era.

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Emily Tomasello - Art

Emily Tomasello
Renaissance art has always been interesting to me because I went to a Catholic school for eleven years before transferring to a public school. Now, why is this important? Well, we had “Religion” class every year, and art was always a topic of discussion. As mentioned in the video, religion was very dominant in the Renaissance. Many of the great painters of the Renaissance period focused on religious themes and were sometimes even commissioned by well-to-do patrons, including the Pope himself! I remember analyzing paintings such as the Wedding at Cana by Paolo Veronese, the Creation of Adam by Michelangelo and of course the Last Supper by da Vinci. When I went to Catholic school, I remember enjoying these lessons on Renaissance artists but not really seeing the importance in the real world. However, as I got older, and even now, I realized that Renaissance art made a huge impact on the world. New techniques were brought about for artists to use through paintings, sculptures, architecture and more leaving a lasting legacy.

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Henry Pham

Hi Emily! I agree with you about how much Renaissance art has contributed to our world. It has contributed to much more than just art; it facilitated the thought of the Era, which focused on humanism, which emphasized the value of the human race. I feel like for many people in the world, we think of art as just that – art, and nothing else. The thing is that art is so useful in spreading the morals and thoughts of a group of people or even a century! You noted how the art that you studied from the Renaissance had to do with religion and its themes. Art is so versatile and when we look back at old eras of art such as this one, we get to see how influential art is to our lives and everyone around us.

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Zjlinney

I did a little more research on Gian Lorenzo Bernini. He was born in December 7, 1598. His career as an artist started as an apprenticeship to his father Pietro Bernini who was also a sculptor. Bernini specializes in sculpture and excelled in the Baroque style. Bernini is well known for his artwork called, “David” (1624) and his skills with the Baroque style. During this time period the artwork was more defined and elaborate. The sculpture using the Baroque style depicted exaggerated drama in its finest detailed. This art form is interesting and the detailed that goes in to the painting or sculpture is amazing and creative. I am familiar with the Renaissance style more than the Baroque style. However learning about Bernini I got to see what Baroque style is and understand it a little more.

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itsjazelle

Jazmin Mejia

In response to Linney Sar

I appreciate that you did more research on Gian Lorenzo Bernini and I actually didn’t know that his father was also a sculptor. Also, like you, I am more familiar with the Renaissance period than the Baroque period. In fact, I never even knew the Baroque period existed before this video, so that was fun to learn about. Furthermore, both the Renaissance and the Baroque period were very beautiful and interesting to learn about. Also, it’s fun to see that some neighborhoods of this day are still being influenced by these periods. Like close to my house, there is there shopping plaza called The Renaissance Plaza and there’s even major hotel corporations inspired by the Renaissance period.

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Marissa Sar

Hi Linney!
I had definitely learned new facts from the video. It’s great to also learn from your own research of the time periods. Actually one of my questions after watching the video was how did these artists get their inspiration or learned the different techniques for their artwork. So, it was interesting to learn from your post that the artist, Bernini, was an apprentice to his father. Also I would agree that I like the Renaissance period because it’s a time of new ideas and creativity.

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Jessica Obrique

Gosh, learning about the Renaissance period again gave me a lot of nostalgia. I’ve learned about it back in high school and even today I think it is completely fascinating. The style of the artworks were so intricate and beautiful I can’t imagine how they did it. One of the focuses of the period was religion. It was interesting how it was incorporated into the artwork. There are so many important pieces from that period that I don’t think art would’ve progressed so much without it.

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Felix Huynh

Yeah, I agree with you. Listening to this video about the Renaissance made me think of all the paintings and works of art that my teachers so many years ago let us see. I remember watching videos on the Renaissance and the artists like Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. Learning about the pieces of art they made and how popular those works of art became in modern times. It’s cool to see how the lessons of the Renaissance teachers gave me about 10 years ago are still prominent in today’s art and culture. I would say this video reminded me of a lot of things about the Renaissance and taught me some new things about it as well.

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superyessi

Yesenia Hernandez

I agree with you. This video was a little nostalgic as I did remember learning about these artists in high school and middle school. I think its also interesting how influential these eras are today and people continue to dissect the meaning of these pieces of art. Religion is an important aspect in these eras. Art is a reflection of the time and culture. During these eras the Catholic Church was very influential therefore the creation of many faith based paintings. Da Vinci’s Last Supper is an iconic piece till this day. You can find his painting in many homes, including my own.

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reynareal

Reyna Real
In this weeks video we learn about the Renaissance and Baroque era which I think is one of the most popular and interesting in art history. I found the art of both eras to be very beautiful and very interesting to learn about. Each of the artist work is so unique and is influenced by past art pieces. Da Vinchi well known painting is the Mona Lisa. The Mona Lisa is a very famous painting that many people know about. Another artist work that was interesting was Bernini’s sculptures that are very beautiful for example the Saint Teresa one. Its really interesting to see that artist influence other artist.

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Dabidlai

David Lai

Hi Reyna! The Renaissance and the Baroque era have paved a long road for the upcoming pieces of art that came by in the recent centuries. Art history is broad, and the nature of art is, is up to the interpretation of the viewers. But i can see as the class unanimously agrees that the sculptures and the creation of the artwork in these times are greatly influential. Everybody knows about the Mona Lisa, and the Sistine Chapel. Additionally, the statue of Saint Teresa is a grandeur masterpiece. I hope that the degree in which these artists’ put their hearts and souls out to their work will continue to encourage the youth and the current generation of innovative artists to put their effort and love out to everything they do, such as the art in the video.

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itsjazelle

Jazmin Mejia

Today’s art talk discussion video talks about the Renaissance and Baroque time period. Honestly, the only artist that I actually knew/ heard about was Leonardo da Vinci and that’s because I studied his piece the Mona Lisa in high school. Furthermore, this discussion video was very insightful because it introduced me to many artists that I didn’t know they existed during the Renaissance and Baroque period. For example, I really liked Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s sculpture titled Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. I also appreciated Paul Rubens take on Saint Teresa however I don’t think it was better than the original, it was just different but a good different. Lastly, it is nice to know that even back then artists influenced other artists or even regular people just like in today’s world.

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Felix Huynh

I remember learning about the Renaissance in elementary school and middle school. It’s a pretty cool subject, since so many of the big names were mentioned in this video as well. I remember learning about the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo and the Last Supper by Da Vinci. Obviously the most popular of all the works of art right now is the Mona Lisa by Da Vinci as well. It was nice to hear about all this stuff again after so long. My class in elementary school used to take us to the museum to see paintings and sculptures, specifically replicates of renaissance art.

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Henry Pham

In school we are educated by art and one of the most memorable eras that was taught in K-12 is the Renaissance Era. Essentially, the Renaissance was a rebirth and a movement in the importance of man. Brought on by the idea of humanism, we experienced many influential and monumental developments. One of which was Renaissance art, which was perpetuated man as a driving force in the world. The art did wonders for the era, with many works on art still notable today, such as the Sistine Chapel and that of Da Vinci. Art is a tool that can be used to express thought and advance more things than just art itself. In the case of the Renaissance, the art from the time heavily contributed to the Era.

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reynareal

Reyna Real
Hi Jessica I agree with you about the renaissance period being a fascinating time to learn about. I feel like a lot of art today is influenced by the renaissance era. We learned about many artists in this era who’s works is so beautiful and unique. We also see that art is always constantly being influenced by art pieces from the past.

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superyessi

Yesenia Hernandez
2:30

When I think of the word art, I automatically think of Michelangelo and Da Vinci. These two artist are well known and very influential, even in popular culture. For example, two Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are both are named after these artists. Michelangelo and Da Vinci are from the Renaissance Era. The Renaissance era is important because the human figure and mind were important aspects of art. I think the human figure is the most beautiful thing to paint. I did not know much about the Baroque era before this video. I find it to be an interesting era as there was a Counter Revolution driven by the Catholic Church during this time which produced many faith driven images but at the same time many secular images came about because of the division of Protestants from the Catholics. Everyday activities also became important aspect of art. I like Baroque paintings like Judith slaying Holofernes by Gentileschi because there is viewer interaction in the paintings and it is very dramatic. I like feeling a part of art it makes it more interesting and relatable.

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belenbarragan

Belen Barragan 2:30

I totally agree with you Yesenia. Every time I hear art, I think Michelangelo and Da Vinci are the first two people to pop into my head. The rich European art culture has been instilled into history education quite strongly I think. Like you said, even with pop culture you could see them both pop out (like in TMNT). Specifically Da Vinci, I find quite fascinating with his advancements in science. Like you stated, the human figure was important in the Renaissance era, as seen through the art of the time. But also, interesting enough, Da Vinci specifically also studied the human anatomy in depth and with a more scientific approach. i think the importance of the human body at the Renaissance era was far more important that just for simple aesthetic art. i think this era is quite fascinating with all of the things that were happening at once: science endevours, art creations, re-birth and even the beginning of the deterioration of the Catholic Church.

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lizzystiller

Hey Yesenia,
I agree that this is the kind of things that pop into my mind when people say the word “Art”. It is crazy that these names, Leonardo Da Vinci and Michelangelo, are so well known that basically everyone knows who they are. It is refreshing having everyone at least know some artists back then as many could not tell you any artists in this age. These days people can only universally know names such as Kardashian or Justin Bieber. It really makes me wonder if the artists of the Renaissance could see the people who are famous and we admire in this age, what would they think?

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Marissa Sar

Marissa Sar
Although I have taken an art class in middle school, I don’t really remember in great details about the Renaissance and Baroque periods. However, after watching the video, there were new facts that were review, and others that I have never heard before. I have heard of the Mona Lisa, which was painted by Leonardo De Vinci. Based on my research, there is a lot of speculations on the identity of the women in the painting, but it’s definitely does not over-shadow the fact that the Mona Lisa is well known around the world until this day. For the Baroque period, I also have heard Michaelangelo, but I never knew that he, including other artists, can do different tasks, such as being a sculpture, painter, or an architect. So, that was great to see the different areas that they are talented at doing. It made me want to have the skills that these artist had to created such beautiful art works. I wonder what inspired them or taught them how to come about making artwork. Overall, I am amazed.

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linruiwen

Ruiwen Lin

In response to Marissa Sar. I agree with you that we were amazed after watching this video. And I think that Bernini’s sculpture of David is better because of how it portrays David in motion, giving his character strength and making the David seem more human. I have viewed many of this paintings before, but I did not know they belonged to the Baroque era.

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Pamela Ajoste

Prior to watching the video, I did not know much about Baroque; however, I learned about Renaissance in high school. Some familiar names, such as, Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Bernini were also mentioned. The art pieces that were created during this time are one of the most famous art ever created. A few examples are the painting of Mona Lisa, the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and the sculpture of David. In my opinion, this era of art is very interesting. They were artwork that focused mainly on religion. Each artwork is also very detailed and intricate.

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belenbarragan

Both the Renaissance and the Baroque alike are both eras that I actually have some sustainable knowledge on sue to previous courses. I always did have a hard time to distinguish amongst the two and be able to differentiate them. I did some further research about the primary difference between Baroque and Renaissance art. Renaissance is considered the more “classical” art and architecture. In some way, it was trying to imitate that of Greek and Roman times. Baroque on the other hand is the “over-embellishing” art style. Its said to be an extremely ornate and exaggerated form of the Renaissance. I think the sculptures that Michelangelo did in the late renaissance do remind me a lot of the depictions of greek and roman sculptures or paintings of humans (especially in greek mythology). Its very interesting to be able to actually identify major parts about these art periods and actually begin to build connections amongst different time periods.

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lyds chang

Belen, I have to agree with you on that. The two were initially hard to distinguish (and still is a bit) but after some research, I can tell that there are some big differences between the two periods. To me, the Renaissance was a period of realism starting to emerge into artworks and perspective starting to be incorporated into them, as well. On the other hand, Baroque was a period of emotion and drama which were put into the artwork of that time. I think that the Baroque period is more interesting to me because of the intensity and emotions put into the pieces.

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amazeeana23

Ana Gomez.

Watching this video gave me so much more insight into the time periods that it outlines. The Renaissance and Baroque time periods were both eras full of beautiful and fascinating art. Artists like Michaelangelo and Da Vinci are names that are modern stamps of art, and this video really illustrates the impact they had on the world of art. These are eras that although I did briefly learn about in middle school, I don’t know too much about. It was really nice being able to delve back into a subject like this that paints a picture so open to interpretation.

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lizzystiller

I took a European history class last year and it was refreshing to finally hear some familiar names. When someone says the word “Art”, this is what I automatically picture, the Renaissance. The Renaissance was a cultural revolution. People were coming out of the Dark Ages and realizing there was way more to life. These amazing works of art are known throughout the world and will always be. It’s funny seeing the picture of all the people huddled around the Mona Lisa. It is a lot smaller in person that what you imagined it to be. I remember my mom and dad went on a trip throughout Europe as they were visiting my Dad’s family and my mom wanted to go to the Louvre but my dad didn’t want to wait in line. It’s interesting seeing how art has changed over the years. Back then a painting had to be very detailed and usually relating to religion in some way. Now, as we have been learning, art has been coming very more abstract and too the own person’s interpretation. It makes me wonder if the artist of then like Leonardo and Michelangelo would consider what we do today art.

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Savannah

I think that way all the time. “what would they think of this?” One thought that comes up in my head every morning is “I wonder if women who lived before makeup would think that we look beautiful when we wear it, or would think we look like clowns?” We, of course, think the things of today are beautiful. We create them. We also think things in history are beautiful. It makes me wonder how much is going to change in the future.

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beansartblog

Arvan Arguelles

The renaissance period was quite interesting. I agree with the idea that the Madonna and Child Painting have a Gothic feel to it. I learned that the Mona Lisa has the country of origin of Italy. I though the painting of Raphael’s painting of him painting his girlfriend was pretty funny but genius at the same time. Michelangelo’s work as a painter, sculptor, and architect was breathtaking. From the Sistine chapel to the sculpture of David, the renaissance movement definitely sparked new perspectives and changed art during that period. Spain and Italy had Bernini, who also was a painter, sculptor, and architect, who made his own version of the sculpture of David. Bernini’s altarpiece for the Cornaro Chapel was spectacular, especially based on the description. Professor described this piece to be shaded with gold, illuminated by the skylight through the hole found in the ceiling. This remarkable sculpture was very powerful. From my take on it I thought this work of art was called ecstasy due to the feeling that the drug can lay on a person. This reinforces the feel of the baroque being a dramatic era.

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Savannah

Savannah Avalos
I’ve always been a fan of Renaissance and Baroque art. We covered it pretty extensively in my AP European History class in high school, and that test was one of the few that I actually got a decent grade on. I love comparing pieces, like Bernini’s vs Rubens’s depictions of St. Teresa. Art from these eras were so different from art today. When I think about it, art then would be more relatable to photography now, since both try to capture feelings and expressions and also manipulate things like light and texture. I think that artists then were also more honest in their work. Today, we use photoshop like crazy to smooth out lines and tuck things into place. We are so concerned with taking something then manipulating it to make it what we think is beautiful. Then, portraits were more honest. Bodies looked more natural, especially bodies of women. They drew what they thought was beautiful, just the way it was. I appreciate this time in art more than any other time.

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Zack Ngov

Savannah,

I like your comparison of the Renaissance and Baroque art to photography today. We have a lot of tools today when it comes to art such as photoshop like you said. Artists can use photoshop to create more effects,more aesthetics, and fix mistakes while back then, the artists had little tools to separate their art from other artists. It’s amazing that Bernini was able to separate himself and be unique by utilizing dramatic scenes like in the St. Teresa painting or the crude facial expression in his David sculpture.

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lyds chang

I have learned about the Renaissance Era from elementary to high school, but not as much about the Baroque Era. The Renaissance was a revolutionary period for the arts because it started an era of art as an integral part of society. Many famous pieces and artists known worldwide today were from this era and it is not hard to see why with names such as da Vinci and Michelangelo. I’ve always been interested in this era because this was such a revolutionary time period in art history (in my opinion). While I have heard of Bernini, I never really knew much about him or his works, outside of “The Rape of Prosperpina” (thanks AP Lit). Upon some Googling and research, I realized that I actually knew a lot of the works (ie Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi & his bust of Jesus Christ).
Also, I looked more into the Baroque Era and was amazed by the portrayal of the subjects. While Renaissance pieces were the first to use perspective and add a sense of realism into their works, the sense of adding “depth” failed to showcase emotions and failed to capture those emotions. On the other hand, Baroque pieces fill in that “emptiness” in many of their recreations of Renaissance works. (A popular comparison being of Michelangelo’s statue versus Bernini’s recreation; emotionless David heading into battle versus an intense David roaring into battle against Goliath.) Renaissance art works did not completely depict human emotion, while Baroque art focused more on showing them.
I think the stark contrast between these two eras are very fascinating to learn about and to compare and contrast the differences in intensity between the two.

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Zack Ngov

I never took a European history class or any art class, so most of the stuff in the art talk was new to me. I think it is cool that the different artists had different interpretations of the same person such as the sculptures of David by Bernini and Michelangelo. The Bernini one has a more serious and manly facial expression while the Michelangelo one has a more relaxed and elegant facial expression. Another interesting contrast is Bernini’s and Rubens’ depictions of St. Teresa. Bernini’s depiction has a sexual and ecstasy look while Paul Ruben’s has a more proper expected look. Overall, I really like the Renaissance and Baroque art. The art is very interesting because it includes near naked sculptures and their paintings use colors more on the darker side.

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samanthagomezblog

Samantha Gomez
This weeks video we are back to a timeline video, one which I truly enjoyed. We discussed the renaissance and the Baroque period. As several of my classmates mentioned before me. It can be a bit confusing to know the periods of art and how they correlate with history, however I am extremely grateful to the internet, for helping me clear things up. These videos are also very useful. One thing I really enjoyed about this video was how you ( professor Z) mentioned that religion was still revelent in these time periods. I also enjoyed that there were quick mentions of other periods or eras. My favorite piece of art that was shown in the timeline was the Saint Theresa marble sculpture with the lights and gold leaf.

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linruiwen

Ruiwen Lin

After watching the video, I realized that I actually did know a little about the Renaissance and Boroque. Some big names such as Michelangelo, Da Vinci, and Bernini are all names that I recognized while watching the video. As mentioned in the video, religion was very dominant in the Renaissance. Many of the great painters of the Renaissance period focused on religious themes and were sometimes even commissioned by well-to-do patrons, including the Pope. It was interesting to see how influential Raphael’s LaFornarnia is, as several artists recreated it in their own work years later. Gian Lorenzo Bernini emulated many of Michaelangelo’s works such as his own sculpture of David. I think that Bernini’s sculpture of David is better because of how it portrays David in motion, giving his character strength and making the David seem more human. I have viewed many of this paintings before, but I did not know they belonged to the Baroque era. I learned new knowledges from this video.

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Dabidlai

David Lai

The Renaissance was a sort of familiar time for me in the art history, and the art world in general. Leonardo Da Vinci, very iconic person. He painted the famous Mona Lisa. I even remember seeing the famous Mona Lisa in a ride in some amusement park in Disneyland. I have a feeling it was the Haunted Mansion Ride, but I don’t necessarily remember. I feel it is iconic if people think of making a spin on it. It has debuted in an Spongebob even. Essentially, the image is huge! I see pictures such as the ‘Sistine Chapel’ and literally tear up because of how beautiful it is. What an amazing work of art! Michelangelo of the high-Renaissance has seriously left his mark on Western culture. Fun fact: the painting of the Sistine Chapel took fifty-four months to complete (at least 4 years) and the Pope asked Michelangelo if he can paint it again. a quote from Michelangelo is “If people knew how hard people worked to get my mastery, it would not be wonderful at all.” This is likely due to the fact that sometimes we are our own biggest critics. I did not ever hear of other artists such as Bernini in the Baroque time, but his interpretation of David compared to Michelangelo’s seemed pretty similar. A little reminder is that David is the hero in the bible as he defeated Goliath. Bernini’s statue of David illustrates a little more hardship that the bible story speaks of in David’s lesson. I am greatly impressed by these masterpieces and I would hope to see them all one day in my travels.

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Maria Leon

David,
I agree with you on how beautiful these art pieces are. Thank you for that interesting fact, this made me wonder how did people react to when artist like Michaelangelo finished their pieces. It’s crazy how someone put so much time into painting especially painting a ceiling. I think he knew that he was going to become a legend and leave a mark in history. I also hope that in the future I can see those art pieces in person. I also think we learn a lot of that period having those art pieces

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Jose Perez

Jose Perez
Throughout the duration of the video, I was very engaged as I was familiar with the topic. When the video was discussing about Leonardo Di Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” and Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel paintings, I knew exactly what they were talking about because I was fortunate enough to see these paintings in person. Two summers ago, I traveled to Europe and toured to France and Rome, which then led to the viewings of these paintings. The Mona Lisa is not as big as many people think. In fact, the Mona Lisa is a fairly small painting. What caught most of my attention was the Sistine chapel. The Sistine chapel has a marvelous painting on the ceiling, where no light is present or pictures allowed because the light will eventually eat the original paint. By seeing these paintings first hand, it drew a better image in my head while I was watching the video.

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Maria Leon

The Renaissance and the Baroque era are probably one of my favorite eras of art history. A lot of the paintings and sculptures really demonstrate how people were living especially the wealthy. Watching the video reminded me of when I visited the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena and I was amazed by all the paintings during the Renaissance period. One of my favorite paintings to see was Madonna and Child with Book by Raffaello Sanzio. I think it is interesting that many artist painted the same object or person but all added their own technique and their own perspective. I think this era contains many treasures that are going to be preserved forever. It really shows how intelligent and talented people were back then. Something also interesting is how many people have studied these arts especially Michaelangelos’ like there are hidden messages or things he wants us to find out.

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chknalfredoart110

Alfredo Reyes
Through the video i found it very interesting with the familiar topics I’ve learned in school but realized i actually knew a little about about the Renaissance and Boroque. A few names were names were mention that I were familiar with are Da Vinci, Bernini and Michelangelo. The video also explains how religion was the main factor in the Renaissance. As Michelangelo’s work as a painter, sculptor, and architect was very mind blowing. The two different eras containing amazing work and how its visualized in today’s society of sculpture.

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Juli Yoshinaga

Juli Yoshinaga
I remember learning about the Renaissance Era and the artwork that came from that era quite a bit in my history classes. However, I was unaware of Boroque, as it had not been mentioned in school history. I was amazed to learn about the history and the artwork that came from the many generations of the Renaissance. Lorenzo Bernini’s work with depicting ecstasy was by far the most intriguing piece for me. The Cornaro Chapel Rome was beautifully made, and I find it fascinating that Bernini was aware of the lighting, or lack of lighting, that he made this piece in gold, which reflected beautifully and many times of the day. Additionally, I could not have agreed more with the association this piece might give to the modern day citizens of the world. The Cornaro Chapel Rome may look like a sexual piece, however, during the Renaissance, people saw the piece differently, which goes to show that we have evolved in the ways we think, make, or do activities. A simple work of a nude painting or sculpture was acceptable back in the day, but I can assume that a very different response would be given if many of those were made today. I appreciate the intricate work of the Renaissance and Boroque, I’m astonished by what has been created in the short span of time.

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