Art110-2016-Fall-banner

Schedule

Last Warning: Organize your website

Many of you have “Site Title” as the name of your website. It should be something else! Like:

  • Glenn Zucman Art110
  • Art Adventures
  • Glenn’s World
  • Sailor Kelly

Also many of your themes came with “Demo Content” things like “Sample Post” that let you see how the theme will look even before you’ve posted much or any content. Now that you’ve got some content please delete those demo posts.

IF YOUR WEBSITE IS STILL NAMED “SITE TITLE” AFTER THIS WEEK I WILL NOT GIVE YOU POINTS FOR YOUR WORK.

If you need help with this or anything else, you can:

  1. Ask online
  2. Come to before class OH on Wed 11:30-12:30 @Robek’s / Coffee Bean umbrella tables
  3. I can go to AS-120 (AS building is next to The Beach Hut, next to The Library) after class on Wed, at 3:45 and help anyone with anything until all questions are answered.
  4. Make an appointment to meetup another time

Featured Images

When you’re making a post you can add images. I think you’ve all got this! 😀 You can also specify one image as your “Featured Image.” This image is the one that many themes will use on your home page. You’ll see on some of your websites that the demo posts show images on the home page and your new posts don’t. If you spedify a Featured Image that will fix this.

Artist Conversations

Classmate Conversations

  • Be sure to state your classmates First and last Names.
  • Be sure to include a (live!) link to their website.
  • We don’t have a Classmate Question OTW yet, why don’t you write one: beacharts.ca/fall16-qotw/

Post Naming!

Please use this format:

Wk2 – Art Experience – Plaster Casting
Wk2 – Artist Conversation – Brianna Allen
Wk2 – Classmate Conversation – Geri Weckstein

Most of you are using good post names, but a few aren’t. Remember that: Wk2 – Classmate Conversation – Geri Weckstein < the “Geri Weckstein” is the classmate / artist I talked to, not my own name! 😀

Points on BeachBored

All points through Week 3 are now up on BeachBored. Be sure to check your points and know where you stand! So far we’ve had 153 points possible. Here’s how many points you should have to be on track for each grade level, and how many peeps in 1p / 2:30 are currently at each grade level:

A = 138 points – 55 / 45
B = 122 points – 6 / 7
C = 107 points – 1 / 2
D = 92 points – 0 / 1
F = 91 points – 3 / 7

  • 1p GPA = 3.69
  • 2:30 GPA = 3.32

A lot of great work you guys – Congratulations! But we do have 11 peeps headed for D’s or F’s. If that’s you:

  1. Are you even reading this?
  2. You should get moving with the Art110 course work TODAY. Or drop the class TODAY. Do not just flounder not turning work in and digging a deeper and deeper hole for yourself!

If anyone has any questions or needs any help, please ask me. Sooner is better! My virtual OH is Monday 9-10am at BeachArts.ca/chat. You can also ask questions there 24/7. You can also email me: glenn.zucman@csulb.edu. And my RL OH is Wednesday 11:30-12:30 at the Umbrella Tables outside Robek’s / Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf at the USU. I can also meet with you at other times by appointment.

Leaderboard

Top 5 @1pm:

Stephanie Archiva in the CSULB Gatov Gallery West with a painting by Andrew Hansen

Stephanie Archiva in the CSULB Gatov Gallery West with a painting by Andrew Hansen

  1. Maritess Anne Inieto, 205
  2. Stephanie Arciva, 196
  3. Melissa Rios, 194
  4. Carlos Villicana, 183
  5. Selena Lara, Joy Elizabeth Uba, Brian Sath, 178

Top 5 @2:30:

Jamie Van & friends wearing floral wreaths courtesy of Snapchat

Jamie Van with Brandon Hong & Savannah Avalos

  1. Lydia Chang, 211
  2. Jamie Van, 198
  3. Adriana Maciel, 190
  4. Samantha Gomez, 183
  5. Jessica Obrique, 182
close up photo of a hand holding a blue paper origami boat

Shalene Holm at the Long Beach Maker Society installation in the CSULB SOA Dutzi Gallery

Linney Sar & Claudia Sanchez @CSULB SOA Werby Gallery w artist Alvaro Alvarez Salazar

Linney Sar & Claudia Sanchez @CSULB SOA Werby Gallery w artist Alvaro Alvarez Salazar

Activity Wk 4

Our Week 4 Art Activity is Automatic Drawing. Some of you will find it a lot of fun. Some of you will find it frustrating. Try not to get frustrated! Try to relax and have fun with it.

Your Art Kit came with 2 big sheets of paper and 3 pastel sticks. 1 sheet of paper is for this activity (the other sheet is for the “Finger Painting” activity.) Find a big board or heavy cardboard or something you can tape your paper down on. When I make these I usually just do 1 pass on them. But I’ve found that students like doing several passes on top of each other. That’s why you got the 3 colors of pastels.

Experiment. Have fun! Don’t stress.

Art Talk OTW

  1. 3 Million Years of Art History
  2. Joseph DeLappe
  3. Mahsa Soroudi
  4. The Mind in the Cave

Nice discussion of Mahsa Soroudi’s work last week everyone! This week we’re finally back to the “AH Timeline” with The Mind in the Cave. We’ll look at some of the earliest human art, in this case from Lascaux, France, from about 16,000 years ago. We’ll also consider how this ancient art might connect to “futuristic” ideas as found in stories like the film The Matrix.

Written by Glenn Zucman

BA, Psychology, University of Hawaii, MFA, Intermedia Art, Long Beach State. Host of American Public Media's "Border Patrol." Host of KBeach Radio's "Strange Angels." Interested in Identity Art that explores our Oracle-at-Delphi-like straddling of corporeal and virtual realms in our new media century. Civil rights in online space. 10 years...
Read more

103 Comments

Daniel Martinez

Daniel Martinez
The Lascaux Cave located in Lascaux, France is very intriguing with its cave art paintings and different amusing pathways. Recently on this past September 12, marked the 76th year that this cave was discovered. Perhaps an interesting fact is that the cave has been present for over 20,000 years; however, it was discovered in 1940. The Lascaux Cave holds this famous passage called the “The Hall of Bulls”. Here, this passage holds a variety of hand carved animal paintings such as deer, bison, bulls, and birds. These paintings were carved by prehistoric people. The theory behind these paintings is that the people would use this as a hunting technique. They would carve a picture of their prey into the cave’s limestone, doing ritual beliefs in order to ensure an almost successful hunt. Another theory behind these paintings is that the prehistoric humans would use this as a way of communication. This was a very interesting topic because I had never realized such caves existed. What makes it much more captivating is that these paintings and passages were made by humans 20 thousand years ago. This is just another way to understand their style of living, and their techniques to continue surviving in the world.

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yesenia hernandez

I agree Daniel that it is amazing these caves were formed by humans 20,000 or so years ago. We forget people had to survive without the machines we have today. This demonstrates their ability to survive. I can assure you I would not be able to survive without the comforts I have in this time and place. I think it is cool how cave paintings were used as a form of communication and rituals. Language did not exist then and they need to be able to “talk” in some form. Caves are important aspects of the prehistoric time because they help us how early humans lived and believed. We can find commonalities between people across time and place. For example The Broken Man can be found in the Lascaux cave in France, in South Africa and today in the movie The Matrix. Understanding the significance of this form helps us understand what the core of human beings.

Reply
amazeeana23

Ana Gomez
I agree Daniel, that is very interesting how not many people acknowledge it and we think to ourselves only drawings and paintings can be considered art, but in reality we’re being very naive and not opening up to many other ideas. I agree with Yesenia that is was pretty tight how they used them as rituals and communication.

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megansalinas11

This week’s topic is on the caves found in Lascaux, France. This cave in particular has various different paintings and molds on the walls; ranging from handprints that were either painted on or traced like a stencil, geometric arts that consists of dots and grids and then art pieces that depict animals. These caves are not there to be used as a habitat for these people, these caves were used for special occasions such as rituals. Rituals are held in the Hall of Bulls where very large paintings measuring in at 13 feet, can be found. The animal paintings range from bulls to birds to horses and even deer and they all vary in size, which is a way to really hook the visitors in to see what these paintings depict and how animals in our generation have altered in time. This cave would be pretty fascinating to visit and to really acknowledge and admire the different art pieces that are within the cave; at the Hall of Bulls, the shaft, the axial, and many more passageways.

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ammyphaam

Megan,
I completely agree with your comment about the caves. I find is fascinating that these caves were preserved from many years ago, and today we still get the chance to look at them. It is as if we get to travel back in time and get the opportunity to first hand see the artwork on the caves. It is interesting how the symbols on the walls are engraves because they all have different meanings.

Amy Pham
Art 110- 2:30

Reply
yesenia hernandez

Yesenia Hernandez
Cave art has always been really interesting to me. It is amazing that throughout history art has been a part of people’s lives. Art has been used as an expression of significant aspects of people’s lives. I find it most interesting and unusual that there are never human figures in cave paintings. In cave paintings you can find handprints, geometric shapes and animals, but no people. Rarely a human figure appears in cave paintings. In the Lascaux Cave of France in the Shaft discovered by Marcel Ravidat,there is a human figure on the wall which has been named The Broken Man. The Broken Man is not completely human, it has a bird head and tenderloins. Early humans believed in magic, they could have believed that by painting a human their soul would be lost. The human form was dangerous to them. It is like the belief that looking in a mirror your soul can be trapped. On the walls of caves they drew what they held dear to their life for example animals. On the contrary, not animals that they fed on but maybe animals that had power and magic. As churches paint saints and holy figures on their walls that they worship, it seems natural for early humans to have done the same. A handprint was enough to mark their existence. I personally love handprint art because you can see growth and it signifies life to me. Since, caves were not used for daily living their importance changes. They are sacred and magical locations for ceremonies like vision quests. Caves can inform us of what early humans believed in and motivated their lives.

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Yesenia,
I agree and am definitely surprised that there is no human figures that were painted on the walls as well. I really made me start to question about how did paintings of human figures did come. Also, as you mentioned the significance of the Broken man painting, I also found various information on it and it could also have more than one meaning to it. The painting could’ve went both ways, good or bad and I believe that it’s really on how you would think it means. To some people, it could mean to go on a quest, dying and then help the life of others through you’re spirits and from that perspective, it influence us to create the movie Matrix. I gave me a bigger picture on the fact that one thing can be shared and spread throughout 5 more people and even after, more people than that too, so it was really interesting to learn about!

Reply
Tiffany Phan

Tiffany Phan
At first when I heard of cave art, I imagined it being like the inside of a dark cave with writings and cravings on the stone walls. But after researching about those several caves, it was fascinating to learn more about the Lascaux cave! It was discovered in 1940 by Marcel Ravidat when he was only 17 years old. When entering the cave, there are various different types of cave art on the wall like: the famous Hall of Bulls, Axial gallery, Mondmilch Gallery, Chamber of the Felines and much more! What I found interesting in the video was the “Broken Man” painting-like figure, which is also named “The Shaft of the Dead Man”. After finding out more information, I found that this painting could mean, “size usually equals power.” The figure is trying to become equal to the bison that is also in the painting, but is rejected. What also is interesting is how this painting has been seen in many different places all around the world and even influenced the movie, “The Matrix,” today! I believe that if just that one painting can influence our society today, there are hundreds of thousands of more paintings that has had influence us in a lot of different ways today!

Reply
Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

Dear Tiffany,
I also found the Broken Man painting very interesting. I never would have guessed its meaning being, “size usually equals power.” It is really cool to see another perspective and interpretation of that painting as I feel like there’s not much it could really mean. I think that meaning is also very relevant in our society today as well. Usually we would think the bigger the better, but like you said in your post, that is not always the case as the figure was also rejected. I also agree that there are many other paintings that have influenced us. We may not know about these paintings ourselves, but there is no doubt that art has had an impact on the culture we live in and it will continue to influence future generations as well.

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Raul Silva

Art is a window to a persons thoughts and culture, cave art is such a valued artifact because it allows for everybody to make theories on what life was like at that point of time and because it is not understood solely by the facts of modern day life anybody can do it and lead the way for a better understanding of history and art. The 17 and 19 year old are great proof of how people are valued not of their age but of their knowledge. They were the eyewitnesses of a virtually intact, untouched first hand stories of the people of the past. The comparison of reoccurring ideas that can date back to the earliest of humans is the reason that we should care in understanding what each image represents and symbolize is, no matter how much our technology advances we have the same instincts, thoughts, and desires (varies with cultures but some similarities are always present) and this can give us a much better understanding of cultures that exist. I have always found it fascinating how we are just animals that believe in self-purpose and everything that we do is to fulfill that set purpose. The cave painting is proof that the desire to fulfill ones purpose has always been there and drives people to do illogical things (from a survival stand point) such as enter an altered state to become “wiser” or doing homework it stems from the same root.

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Linney Sar

Hi Raul,

I agree on your comment on how “art is a window to a persons thoughts”. The artworks of the past are artifacts that have significance to the human society. Art can represent a person’s inner thoughts with new discoveries of hidden artwork of the past an understanding is created in learning about our ancestor. Society today try to gain knowledge and try to understand the past, future, and unknown by looking for evidence in the present. By viewing the cave art can give us a sense of understanding, however we are only interpreting and making comparison that we can relate to of the human instinct. Interpretation allows room for creating a connection to things humans find similar or what they can relate to. The discoveries of art of the past help us create a understanding of our existence on earth and connection to one another.

-Linney Sar

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Linney Sar

Linney Sar

For the cave art I was expecting simple stick figures and simplistic drawings. The video on the cave art in Lascaux, France in the “Hall of Bulls” looks intricate and spectacular. The color of the cave art is very vibrant and detailed on the bulls and the broken man. The animals that Paleolithic painted in the cave in Lascaus shows how important art history can be to the human history. The existence of cave art shows that art can be important and can contribute to history in the understanding of civilization during the Paleolithic period. Currently today many people appreciate art, having evidence of the cave art shows that people who came before us appreciated art and that art has significance to their culture and spiritual practices. Art comes with many messages with new discoveries being made everyday. The cave art might be a form of recording or documentation to pass along information to the next generation.

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megansalinas11

Linney
I totally see where you’re coming from with your idea of cave art and how important it is. Civilization during this time period, isn’t something that we would understand without seeing the different paintings and carvings that are found in caves. Art has been an area of life that not everyone can relate to or see how it is important, but with these different cave art pieces, people can get a sense of art has been transformed through the years/centuries and really see how it has grown since then.

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Nathan Davalos

Before watching this video and doing a little bit of research of the cave in Lascaux, I was also expecting there to be simple art such as stick figures and symbols with little detail. But after watching the video I was shocked to see the type of art that are in the cave. It is so surreal to know that even though this cave was discover not too long ago, the art was made over 10,000-20,000 years ago. I also agree on your point that art is cultural and can show the many ways in how life was lived so long ago. One day the art that is being crafted today will be discovered by some many years later and they will see how the change in culture is drastically different from the present time.

Reply
hrandonbong

Brandon Hong

Hey Linney Sar, I completely agree with you on your point of view with the stick figures and underwhelming art. I really expected nothing more from people who didn’t even have a working toilet, but boy was I wrong. These ancient people drew better than me! Those paintings in the Hall of Bulls was truly awe-inspiring. They were so vibrant with colors and images even though they only had 2-3 colors. I also agree with how we learn from the past and how these people gives us insight about their lives through their art. Even the ritual area where they go into trance like states was actually contaminated with carbon dioxide, which in turn explains to us how these ancient people got their visions. These caves have a lot of history in them and it teaches us many things about how the people of those times lived.

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Marissa Sar

Hi Linney!
I totally agree with you that learning about art has broaden my perspectives on what art can be. Before learning about caves, I would have thought that artwork the caves’ walls was more of a way of story-telling. However, now I see there is more to it that to the culture itself, as well as to today’s society, and the art spectrum . The intricate-detailed artistic styles on the walls has definitely left me in awe as well. Overall, I am grateful to learn about another aspect of what art can be expressed as.

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Mark Nguyen

Mark Nguyen

Lascaux has art that dates back to around 16,000 years ago. It is located in France and consists of a cave and different networks of areas with all kinds of art. It was discovered in 1940 by Marcel Ravidat, and has been studied and explored since then. There are many different areas of the cave which contain art such as the Axial Gallery, Hall of Bulls, and the Shaft. The pictures in the Hall of Bulls are very impressive and well drawn. It is really cool to see how people were able to make their own art back in ancient times. It is very interesting to see that art is virtually everywhere, even in places that kind of retract from human civilization, like caves. The Broken Man in the Shaft is also a very interesting piece. It appears to be shaped like a human, but has talons and the head of a bird, which seems to be broken. I think the theory of how the bird represents a man who combined with an entity or spirit is pretty mind blowing and quite awesome. Despite being drawn around 16,000 years ago, it is really crazy how some of the pictures look like they could have been drawn just yesterday. I think that this kind of reinforces the idea that even if we humans die out, art will continue to live on and be apart of the world.

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nkechiokoroma

Hey Mark, I also thought it was cool how people made their own art many years ago. Its crazy how that even though we don’t have the same kind of supplies as the people back then, art then and art now is still very similar. So similar, that the “broken man” is seen all throughout history in many different places. It would be really interesting to see how far in time this “man” travels and how much impact he can potentially have.

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Marissa Sar

Marissa Sar
Although I have seen movies or cartoon shows depicting animals figures inside a cave’s walls, I would just think of those figures as a way of story-telling not necessarily an art form. However, after watching the video, the handprints, geometric shapes, or animals shown on the walls are the forms of art they use. Another interesting point is that they do not draw human figures, which I wonder what is the reason behind that, but it is stated that’s probably associated with the belief practices that they do spiritually. I just admire that those who created the artwork used onto the cave’s walls as their “canvas” is interesting. Paper was probably not available to them yet, so I admire that they would use whatever is available from their environment. Another fact is that the caves are not usually used as home for inhabitants, but for special occasions. As well as, I admire the 17-year-old, Marcel Ravidat, who discovered a cave because it shows that it doesn’t matter what age you are as long as you have interests and curiosity in a subject anything can happen. Lastly, I’m definitely left with a “broader” perspective of what art can be.

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Fatima Negrete

I agree that when I was little I did not know that hand pints were a type of art form. I just thought they were there just because the people living there did not have paper. I didn’t think about it too much when was little. As of right now, the hand prints were art because it was meaning for the people back then because it was a form of writing. Today, their hand prints are meaningful to us because we can analyze and study the people who came before us, which is fascinating.

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geteducatedcom

Fatima Negrete-Farias

I found it remarkable that a seventeen year old found a cave along with some friends. When I heard about this, I was thinking about how some parents are too protective to even let their children roam around. Nonetheless, it is true that it doesn’t matter how old you are to discover something (as long as you don’t have over protected parents that stop you). When the boy explored the cave and found what appeared to be a dead man, he freaked out. At a first glance of the image that the boy saw, I could only pin point that it has a figure of a human body lying down, perhaps it is dead. I couldn’t distinguish its gender until the video said that it had an erection. In addition, it states that he doesn’t have the head or hand of a human—instead it has the qualities of a bird. I am just puzzled by this. Now, for one of my other classes I learned about the exact same image that frightened the boy. The image that is located at Lascaux Caves, France is titled the Shaft of the Dead Man. The way it was described is the figure of the dead man might have been a hunter who could’ve been killed by the bull that is on his right side. There is a figure in the image that appears to be a spear that penetrated the bull because the bull’s intestines are spilling out of its body. However, the man died, perhaps because he was rammed by the bull, for the bull is facing the same direction as the dead man. As a result, the bird on the stick is a symbol of birds pecking at the corpse and/or that of a soul (the soul of the dead man). Moreover, some images that are created in caves might have been produced by females because an archaeologist discovered that the hand prints in caves are slim and proportion of the thumb and index are long. Back in those days the proportions of male and female body portions were more distinct than in today’s society.

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Nathan Davalos

The cave in Lascaux was discovered in 1940 by a young 17 year old, Marcel Ravidat, and his 19 year old friend. This art in this cave dates back to the Paleolithic Era and was created approximately 16,000 years ago. I took so many years to be discovered but once it was discovered it was set to be one of the biggest discoveries in art history. The art in these caves are none like I have ever seen before. I was expecting there to be stick figured humans, animals with little detail (almost like stick figures), and symbols to show how they communicated in this time. I was completely wrong, the art in this cave is really flat out amazing. To think that this art was created 16,000 years ago with the technology that was presented is so surreal. They had far less materials to be working with than we have today. I one day hope to visit one of these caves in Southern France or the one in Northern Spain.

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Bunny Horn

Hi Nathan Davalos,

I agree with you that the discovered of cave art was set to be one of the biggest discoveries in art history. I think cave art is amazing because the people in the Paleolithic Era has their own unique way to show their art. True, the caves art are none like I have ever seen before. For example, The Hall of Bull, it has a lot of details. Also, true that they had few equipment to express their art and they were able to do with great details. I wanted to travel around to see the different art work that was dated about 16,000 years ago. I, also wanted to visit one of these caves in Southern France.

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gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
I agree with Nathan, i did not really expect much real characteristics in a simple cave painting. When i think about cave paintings, usually stick figures and plain drawings is what comes to my mind. But in the Lascaux paintings, it is completely different, everything is well rounded with real like characteristics, and not to mention the shading in the paintings. Detail seemed to be a great part of their culture.

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Bunny Horn

The Mind in the Cave video was interesting. There are two different arts, the Cave art which is painted cave and the portable art which is small. There are decorated cave that vary in times. In Western art history we say cave art is Southern France and Spain. There are many caves. The famous one are Altamira and Conquer. There are four famous caves; the Altamira, Spain, Lascaux, France, Cosquer, France, and Chauvet, France. Lascaux was discovered by Marcel Ravidal. One thing that we know is that Cave are not home and a places for special events, and early theory that cave has to do with painting because of the animal they eat. There are three arts can find in the cave such as hand prints, geometric art, and animals. For example, the Hall of the Bulls has a great art work. The shaft of the Broken Man occurs across time and human culture. The Broken Man, across time and place, and The Matrix, we see these quester looking for special knowledge across human history and starting from the cave from about 16,000 years ago. This reminds me of Angkor Wat, Cambodia. When I visited Angkor temple, there are a lot carving as I tour around the temple. The carving have a lot of details. It was interesting to learn about cave art.

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hrandonbong

Brandon Hong

This weeks video on cave art is really interesting. When I saw the image of the Hall of Bulls, all I could do was stare at it in admiration. It really amazes me how 16,000 years ago people were able to draw such mesmerizing paintings. It must have taken a lot of work especially since they did not have things like a scissor lift to reach those high places. Even the painting of the bird man was interesting and how throughout time people continued to draw similar images of the bird man. It really makes one think if what these people experienced of spirit walks and spiritual experiences were true. Just like how even though so many civilizations were separated they all have their own legends of a dragon. Not just civilizations in the same continent, but also countries like Japan and the Aztec civilizations had legends of dragons. It really makes one wonder if the past civilizations myths aren’t myths at all.

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itsjazelle

Jazmin Mejia

In response to Brandon Hong

I was also amazed by how much talent there was such a long time ago especially by how little materials they had. It is amazing how innovative and resourceful prehistoric people had to be in order to survive back then. Meanwhile, we have so much more resources/materials but I still struggle to draw a decent stick figure. Also, I really enjoyed how you brought up that different civilizations have their own versions of the legends of a dragon and how maybe all these myths that we’ve heard about may actually not be myths at all. It also saddens me that we will never know if these past civilizations myths aren’t actually myths but on the bright side we can just pretend that dragons once existed.

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Daniel Martinez

Hello Brandon Hong,
It sure is amazing to see such art work done in such big caves. The Hall of Bulls is by far the most interesting passage, as the passage has a variety of art work by talented people back then. Many of the paintings done say to be spiritual or haunting tactics, but whatever reason they decided to do art in the caves, it must have been the best time investing. Such beautiful art work for hundreds of people to see. Very great discussion.

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Valeria Gonzalez

Although I had seen some of the cave paintings in the video before, I still learned and found the information to be very interesting. My favorite cave painting is the Hall of Bulls found in the Lascaux Cave. The colors are vibrant and the drawings are still in beautiful condition despite being thousands of years old. I found the fact that the paintings in the Axial Gallery are all in the ceiling to be very interesting since it must have been a lot more difficult to paint in the ceiling than on the walls. The painting of the Broken Man is also really interesting. I would have never imagined that it shares some of the same themes as the Matrix. It has been years since I last watched the Matrix, so I’m having a hard time connecting the two ideas together. Regardless, it is an interesting piece of information.

This video focused on the cave paintings found in Europe, but they are not the oldest caves known to man. The paintings in Pettakere cave’s (located in Indonesia) are twice as old as the caves found in France. Despite being thousands of years older, the caves also depict animals. It’s interesting that the caves share common elements despite being in different countries, cultures and time periods. I hope that more cave paintings are discovered in the future and unearth even more information about the people who painted them.

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adrianagmaciel

Adriana Maciel

Hi Valeria,
I thought also that the Axial Gallery was really amazing and that it must have taken them a long time to paint on the ceiling of a cave. I’m also pretty upset that I have never heard of it before this video I just watched. The cave art is so unbelievable, it really makes you wonder how they were able to reach up there and how resourceful they must have been since those paintings were far from simple. The fact that they used art as a form of expression while on vision quests was pretty cool to me too because there are similarities between cultures, time period and countries. It’s so amazing that there are some recurring themes throughout history and that we have access to them and are able to take a look into what they were able to express with their art.

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itsjazelle

Jazmin Mejia

I found this week’s discussion to be interesting because it deals with France. I’ve always wanted to travel to France and finally put to good use those four years of learning French in high school but anyways this discussion isn’t about me, it’s about the Lascaux Cave located in Lascaux, France. In fact, on the 12th of September, it marked the 76th year that this cave was discovered but just because it was discovered 76 years ago, doesn’t mean that it has been present for that long. All these various paintings and molds on the walls of the Lascaux Cave have actually been present for over 20,000 years. Amazing isn’t it? I am especially fond of the “Hall of Bulls” which is said to be carved out by prehistoric people and those people would use it as a form of communication and as a good luck ritual to hunt their prey. That is why you’ll find a lot of carved animals paintings on the walls such as horses, deer, bulls, birds, etc. For some reason this cave is giving me the vibe of the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs and how they used them as a form of communication amongst each other. Furthermore, I think it is amazing how prehistoric people were so innovative and resourceful with the little things that they had. I bet if our generation can somehow time travel back to their time, we wouldn’t even survive a week there, heck maybe not even a day!

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Alfredo Gonzalez

Hi Jazmin,

I had the same feeling with the cave and how the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs were used as a communication tool. It fascinates me how the people were so smart and creative to come up these caves and paintings with the little resources they had in the past. They did these paintings with no type of electricity or ladders and for them to have paintings that were over 10 feet tall. The paintings are very colorful and detailed, you are able to understand that stories behind them without having any words written. It makes me wonder what other caves are out there that are still waiting to be discovered.

Reply
linruiwen

Ruiwen Lin

In response to Jazmin Mejia. I feel like the paintings and passages in the cave are like how prehistoric people communicate and share information, as you mentioned how the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs were used as communication tools. And I think prehistoric people are as smart as us today, they carved on the walls in case that animals break their information, and it could be lasted so long till today we still can look in very detailed and enjoy the arts of cave. The arts of cave is very valuable to be studied.

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reynareal

Reyna Real
This weeks topic is on the caves in Lascaux, France. The art in this cave dates back to around 16,000 years ago. I found it amazing that it was discovered in 1940 by a 17 year old named Marcel Ravidal and his 19 year old friend. I was expecting to see drawings of stick figures but when i saw the art paintings I was very amazed as to how detailed they looked by far I was very impressed. In the cave of Lascaux we see the art paintings such as the Hall of Bulls, Axial Gallery and the Shaft, these painting are very amazing art pieces the cave has. Its really interesting to see that art is everywhere even in the smallest places we may never think of.

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lourdessahara

Reyna Real,
I was expecting to see stick figures too! I never would have imagined to see stags,horses,bulls, and mythical creatures drawn across the walls of the caves and the ceiling too. I read somewhere online that Marcel Ravidat found this cave only because he followed his dog down the narrow entrance into this cave. It’s crazy to think that Marcel was just walking his dog with his friends, and then stumbled over a cave that was full of art. Who knows how many more caves there could be that haven’t even been discovered yet, or just art in general.

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Jose Perez

Jose Perez
I agree, it is interesting to see that art is all around us. As discussed in the very first lecture, art can be seen as a form of anything. We are seeing this here with the caves because who would have known that a form of art can be found in a cave. If you think about it, this cave can be a form of an outdoor museum. Every part of the cave is driven off in sections, much like a museum, and every part of the cave was used for special occasions such as rituals, meaning every section consists of its own specific paintings, also very much like a museum.

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adrianagmaciel

Adriana Maciel

This week’s topic is on the caves in Lascaux, France. When I heard the words, “cave art” I quickly envisioned the art that is usually depicted in cartoons or movies of a stick figure throwing an arrow to an animal it was hunt to eat, however, the art in these caves are much more intricate than that. For example,The Hall of Bulls was definitely not what I expected cave art to be since it was about 13 feet tall and the paintings were pretty detailed and colorful even with the limited amount of resources at the time. I was shocked to find out that the people thousands of years ago would not paint humans or their own food they ate but they expressed their journey throughout their vision quests and it also creeped me out that you are able to find different versions of the same ‘bird/human hybrid with an erection’ throughout time and even in different countries. That is very neat and I wonder what the meaning behind that image really is. Something that I always thought was cool was how the paint they used has lasted thousands of years that we are able to look into these cave paintings and ponder about what previous civilizations were doing or how they were living, I wonder whether that will happen to our paintings and sculptures thousands of years from now and if they will appreciate the art we have made during our life time.

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Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma

Hi Adriana Marciel,
I am also concerned about the Broken Man painting as you describe as a bird/human hybrid. I think it is very interesting to see how they combined a human with bird features. I wonder why they didn’t just draw someone in a human form and like you say, you wonder if there’s a meaning behind doing so. I would also like to know why they included bird features to represent a human. Hopefully, one day we find out why they did so and the whole meaning behind it. I guess meanwhile we just have to keep wondering why bird features were used.

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Henry Pham

Adriana, I found it very interesting to see how you managed to see a parallel between the people of old civilizations and ours through the purpose of preserving meaning in our art. In many years, who knows what other people will think of what we have left behind for them. Going back to the concept of meaning in art, I don’t find it very surprising that you would not be used to how their art was. Art forms may change over time, but the meanings may very much be the same to what we have today. In our world today, portraits of humans are very common. It’s a style that we’ve all become used to. However, back in old times, the style seemed to connect back to animals. Let’s not forget that back then, we were a hunter-gatherer society and much of life revolved around plants and animals. Thus, it’s not very surprising that they worshiped animals and gods related to animals. However, if we ignore the stylistic preferences of our ancestors, we see that their message is very much related to messages of people born long after. The cave paintings worship a higher power, much like how Christian art from five centuries does. Art is eternal and it serves as a way for us to speak to people ages after we have disappeared.

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reynareal

Reyna Real
In response to Valeria Gonzalez
I agree with you that the Hall of Bulls painting was a very beautiful and vibrant painting. I could only image the art pieces to be like the ones in movies stick figure of people fighting with spears but when I saw this painting full with lots of detailed work I was very amazed and impressed of such beautiful painting full with lots of detailed work. It’s amazing to see these art paintings that were painted by people in the Paleolithic Era because it’s a way to see past history and I believe that every art piece has a unique story to be told.

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gabrielg454gmailcom

Gabriel Gonzalez
When i first think about cave paintings the first image that comes to my mind are images of simple drawn people after herds of animals like buffaloes, etc. The Lascaux cave paintings in France were discovered in 1940 by a teenager, Marcel Ravidat. What mainly caught my attention of these cave paintings was that most of the paintings in the Lascaux cave rarely have any human figures. There is mainly herds of animals, hand prints, swirls and when there finally appears to be a human body, it tends to have animal like features, most commonly animal heads. Even more amazing is the detail put into the drawings. One would think cave paintings would be drawn plain and so un-accurate, yet the Lascaux paintings are real like with real-like shades and simply better than anybody would expect.

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Jamie Van

Jamie Van
Hi Gabriel,

I also found it really interesting how there were rarely any human figures but I think it is interesting how there are some illustrations with the depiction of a mix of a human and an animal. It implies a mental connection of the early people with the animals that were available during their time and I feel that it also highlights their appreciation of nature. I also had the same thought about the cave painting’s quality. I initially believed that they would be minimal quality carvings in the walls but I was wrong since they actually have a lot of effort and detail put into them. There are different hues of reds, oranges, yellow, and black. I thought that it was interesting how they were able to shade and add colors to their paintings. It really gave it a realistic appeal that I believe added to their intrigue.

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Jamie Van

Jamie Van
During these spiritual adventures in the caves, there was a lot going on from praying to intense spiritual quests. Also, as there may have been rhythmic chanting and ritual, an individual may have felt themselves getting into a different state of mind. Many caves contain natural sources of carbon dioxide, which may have contributed to the individual’s feeling of spiritual enlightenment. I never really thought about decorated caves but I thought it was interesting to look into art caves, such as Lascaux and Chauvet. The Lascaux Cave, based in Lascaux, France, contains many depictions of animals, including deer, vision, bulls, and birds. These illustrations can be found in a famous passage called The Hall of Bulls. They are believed to be a part of rituals. For instance, some ritual beliefs would be involved with the aspect of hunting and contribute to a group’s success in their hunts. In the limestone, they would carve paintings into the cave’s walls and use them as a means of good luck and success. In addition, the cave was discovered by Marcel Ravidat and what he saw was an image called The Broken Man, which is believed to be an illustration of a man who went on a spiritual quest. It had a bird head and a human body, which implied a merging of an animal spirit and a human soul. Supposedly, it would make them stronger and also signify good fortune for the people in the future. These caves were magical locations for early human beings and signify the life and spirits of those who lived on Earth before us.

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lourdessahara

Lourdes Sandoval: 2:30pm

Alongside Montignac, France, a combination of prehistoric cave paintings were discovered by four teeneagers, one of them being Marcel Ravidat. They all stumbled over ancient artwork that were dated 16,0000 year old paintings, mainly consisting of animal representations. One of the caves, called the Lascaux cave, had a passage known as the “Hall of Bulls.” The Lascaux cave depicted many types of animals, such as stags,horses,bulls, and mythical creatures. Marcel Ravidat only saw one human figure depicted in the cave, which had a bird head and an erected phallus. The drawing of the human figure was given the name “Broken Man.” It is believed that the people in these caves did not actually live in the caves; the caves were only used for special occasions. Another belief is that the cave was painted by many different painters. We know this because all the artist did not have the same artistic talent. Another belief is that these paintings were drawn during different periods of time. Reason being, many paintings were painted on top of another. Obviously, these people were not concerned for the first paintings that were previously drawn. My biggest wonder is how these paintings were drawn in the dark. Also, there are many paintings on the ceiling. How were those drawings drawn on the higher areas of the cave? In the dark? After researching more about these caves, I found out that it was opened to the public in 1948, but later closed in 1963 because artificial lights were fading the colors of the paintings.

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Justin Pham

Justin Pham

Hi Lourdes,
I like how you brought up your own mysteries about the cave, because I began to wonder about them as well. It really is amazing on how they were able to paint these images so deep in the cave, with little to no sunlight. This would mean they probably had to bring in a torch along with them. I also think it’s amazing how they were able to paint so high up as well, just as how the stone henge or the pyramids were made to me. I think the cave has definitely made a lasting impression on France.

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Lydia Chang

Justin, I agree with most of your questions on how the art pieces came to be formed. While the light issue can be answered with torches and flames, I also question the height. I like to picture a number of people working together to help one another up (like a human pyramid, maybe) or with the use of makeshift ladders. I think that it is amazing at the lengths that those back then went through to be able to create a piece or be able to do what they did with such dedication. But I also agree that the cave had made a lasting impression not only on France but was a phenomenal discovery to the whole art/history world, as well.

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Valeria Gonzalez

Hi Lourdes,

Just like you, I also wondered how it was that they painted the paintings in the cave. I was intrigued the most by the cave drawings in the Axial Gallery because they are all painted in the ceiling. I tried to see if there are answers to my questions, but I didn’t have much luck. I think it’s fascinating that people throughout time have gone thorough great lengths in order to complete their artwork. It makes me wonder if their paintings would be much more beautiful if they got the chance to paint with the paints we have available to us today. I also wonder if they chose to paint their art in the caves in order to preserve their art? Regardless, I’m glad it was preserved and we were able to witness its’ beauty.

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Justin Pham

Justin Pham

This week, we got to explore the art wonders of the world, and the Lascaux cave in France was the topic of discussion. It started off as a group of teens, one of them being 17 year old Marcel Ravidat, discovering the art cave, which dated back to many centuries ago filled with various types of art on the wall. To me, that’s astonishing due to the fact that teenagers were able to find the one of the “greatest” finds in art history. The cave was layered, and the further in you went, the art styles changed. The art was very vibrant and detailed at the beginning of the passage, but became more simplified as you went deeper and deeper, due to the time differences of each artist. The cave was often viewed as spiritual to others, and had a lasting effect on the artists in France.

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Janett Moctezuma

Janett Moctezuma

While being in this class I have learned that art can be anything that has a meaning to someone. For this week’s art talk I learned that caves are also a form of art to people. I had the opportunity to learn about cave art like the paintings that are found in the famous Lascaux Cave located in Dordogne, France. Different types of art are found in this cave which can vary between hand prints, geometrics, and animals. It must of been very interesting and such a great experience to see all these things that are very ancient. A place that I find very intriguing is the Shaft and in particular the Broken Man painting that is located there. In the video it was said that human figures are not seen and this is true because we can see it in the Broken Man paining. In this particular painting they draw a human with the appearance of a chicken. The human has a chicken head and hands as if they were chicken feet. I would definitely like to know why they do not draw people in human form. Overall, the different cave paintings that were shown were very interesting to see because the drawings were very different from what I’m use to seeing.

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Henry Pham

Through appreciating the art from many centuries ago, we can find a parallel with our beliefs and theirs. The caves in France, along with other caves in Africa depict a mortal man who suffered death and came back as a shaman, leader, and savior. We can see the resemblance between their beliefs and many people in our society today. Many people still believe in a higher power, much like those who painted the art from more than 17 millenniums ago. By creating and preserving the art, our descendants have allowed other ages later to be enlightened by their beliefs and culture. Today we still do the same in our forms of art. We have statues of Buddha, the Sistine Chapel, and various paints that serve to worship and preserve our beliefs. Today, whether it be to people from five centuries ago to many millenniums ago, we still manage to behold the culture and beliefs of those born ages ago through the appreciation of art. Still today, we are leaving behind forms of art that will one day convey to people many years later what we once believed in.

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Jose Perez

Jose Perez
In this week’s video, we learned about the caves found in Lascaux, France. We still see that art can be a form of anything, as told in the very first lecture of the semester, as this lecture discusses the form of art in caves. This specific cave located in France has different paintings and molds in different walls and sections in the cave. These paintings and molds consisted of paintings either traced or drawn by hand, dots and grids, and animal like depictions. The caves were used for rituals not habitats, considering the fact that particular paintings are drawn on the wall. For instance, certain rituals were held in the Hall of Bulls, where paintings as tall as 13 feet high can be found. The paintings of these animals vary from a wide variety of animals such as deer, birds, and horses. The cave not only consists of the Hall of Bulls, but also has divisions of sections including the shaft and the axial. It would be a great experience to have walked across this cave, as such students did.

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Alfredo Gonzalez

Alfredo Gonzalez

This week’s lesson The Mind in the Cave, we learn about the Lascaux cave located in Lascaux, France. Marcel Ravidat first discovered this cave in 1940 at the age of 17 years old. At first I was just expecting a simple cave that had a few paintings on the wall and for it be just a small cave. I was fascinated to learn how the paintings and molds found in the cave was so diverse. The art dates back 16,000 years ago, and there are different areas to the cave like the Axial Gallery, Hall of Bulls, and the Shaft. Each area had specific types of art in them as in the Hall of Bulls you could see art of different animals as bull, deer, and birds. The caves were believed to be a place where people did not actually live in here, instead it was used for only special occasions or rituals. They almost never painted pictures of humans on the wall, only animals. But when Ravidat first discovered the cave, he roped down to the area that is known as the Shaft and there was an image there depicting a human it is known as The Broken Man. The image depicts of a man with a broken, with no hands but bird talons and not a human head but a bird head. The theory is that it is a painting of a vision quester that has died and reborn and merged with the spirit guide and has come back to help the people. It is amazing to see how these arts stayed in great condition all these years and is able to tell so much history without any words written. Things like this is what I love art so much, there is always next discoveries happening that tell us so much about our Earth’s history.

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Zack Ngov

Alfredo Gonzalez,

Ancient art being able to survive thousands of years is a reason why I like art, too. There are probably many more art caves that have yet to be discovered. What is sad is that maybe it can be too dangerous to attempt discovering the caves as suggested in the Art Talk where Zucman says that Ravidat dealt with Carbon Dioxide. Hopefully, someone/a group of people will take on that risk for the benefit of art enthusiasts if there are not already people doing it now.

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amazeeana23

Ana Gomez
The topic this week is on cave art, focusing mainly in four located in Northern Spain, Southern France. When I think of cave art, it reminds me of Ice Age, where there’s scratches and drawings on the inside of the caves, as well as imprints. After looking more into the caves however, I realized that I was wrong and that isn’t all what it’s about. The caves weren’t just used as a home, they were used for various things like rituals.The Lascaux cave, to me, was very interesting, as it was discovered by 17 year old Marcel Ravidat in 1940. In the Hall of Bulls, hang paintings that measure at about 13 feet. There were other passages such as the Axial Gallery, the Chamber of the Felines, and many others. The caves were very nice and interesting, since not many people acknowledge this form of art.

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Jessica Obrique

Ice Age was a great movie haha! I found it interesting too that caves weren’t used as homes. Caves seem like a sturdy and livable place so I’d assume it would make a good shelter. But you can’t always assume things. They must have valued caves a lot more which is why they used it for rituals. I kinda wish I can go back in time to when I was 17 to discover something cool. Marcel did a great job finding it and I’m sure the art world thanks him!

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beansartblog

Hey Ana,

Haha your thoughts on cave are was funny! Just like you, I thought these paintings are amazing! As they were used in rituals, they were highly decorated with great detail, taking the hall of the bulls as an example! I think that it’s so interesting how these pieces of art were made years and years back, years form now, the current art we have will outlive us.

Arvan Arguelles

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Lydia Chang

Over the years of growing up around art, while I was found cave art (& the likes) to be interesting, I never sought to find out more about it. However, this week’s topic created the opportunity for me to and I am truly amazed at the art of such times. The topic focuses on the Lascaux caves, discovered by 17 year-old Marcel Ravidat in 1940. His accidental encounter upon the caves opened the door to what may have been one of the most important milestones in art and history itself. In these caves, there are famous areas, such as, Hall of Bulls, Axial gallery, Mondmilch Gallery, and Chamber of the Felines. While many people think of cave art to be some random paintings and scratches inside a cave or on a wall, I think that they would find it interesting that many arts were used as a form of communication, rituals, and records with plenty of meaning in them. I think that many more would also find it cool that “cavemen” did not actually live inside these caves some 16,000 years ago, but only entered for special occasions and rituals. I think that it is amazing how well preserved these “works” were and how much knowledge people were able to obtain from studying these caves. My favorite part of the caves, minus the Hall of Bulls because animals, were probably the ritualistic carvings and paintings. I found them particularly fascinating because of the meaning and symbolism behind them. For instance, the people would carve a picture of their prey into the cave’s limestone, which would allow hunters a successful hunt and good luck. I think that many people forget how long ago art has really “originated,” but I think that the caves are a strong example to show that art has been something that has been with humanity for ages.

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giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

I am also fascinated by how these humans only used the caves as a sacred space. Their use of the caves shows how although humanity has come a long way, humans continue to engage in rituals in sacred spaces. This gives insight to the fact that humans have a certain DNA makeup that cannot change even though times change. The paintings of their prey as a guide for what to catch is also very fascinating because it shows how they were willing to show each other what to hunt for and which animals were prime for killing. The preservation of the works also amazes me because of their age and the thoughtfulness to paint in the caves which shielded the painting from exposure to natural elements.

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linruiwen

Ruiwen Lin

The Lascaux Cave located in Lascaux, France, and it was discovered in 1940 by Marcel Ravidat when he was at his age of 17. The Lascaux Cave has been present for around 16,000 years, and the paintings and passages on the cave were made by humans. When entering the cave, there are three arts can be found in the cave: hand prints, geometric art, and animals. And there are various different types of cave art on the walls, such like: The Hall of Bulls, Chamber of the Felines, Axial galleryand, etc. “The Hall of the Bulls” is the famous one which painted with many kinds of animals. I think it is very smart to paint on the cave and that prehistoric people used the paintings and passages in the cave to communicate and share information. It may was not arts when did carving in the walls, but it became arts from humans. The art of the cave shows prehistoric people’s lives and thoughts to today’s world, and it is very exciting to study and think about the meanings of the paintings and passages to know about prehistoric humans and their wisdom, and it also influence us in today’s world.

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Zack Ngov

I enjoyed listening to the Art talk about the Lascaux cave. I still lean towards the idea that art is more about drawing, painting, and sculpting, so, it was cool to finally have a lecture about paintings on caves. I think it’s awesome that a group of late teenagers found the cave. I would have guessed it was discovered by an experienced archaeologist or something if it were not for the info being stated in the Art talk. A sad thing is that it seems as if Ravidat is getting most of the credit, which could be fair considering he is the one that climbed the rope. Hearing that the paintings were painted over 10,000 years ago was fascinating and puzzling at the same time. I find it weird that they or the one person who painted the paintings, painted only animals until The Broken Man. I am still left wondering how they made/obtained the materials used to paint considering the art is over 10,000 years old.

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amybecerraart

Amy Becerra
Hi Zack! I was also fascinated with how old the art was. Reading your question about how the prehistoric people obtained the materials made me think of how the art even stayed intact after all these years. The art is extremely old and its amazing to me how it even still exists! It’s puzzling how art can stay around for that long, especially when no one is particularly taking care of it. It makes you think about how art can make a very lasting imprint on our culture.

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amybecerraart

In this week’s art discussion, we learned about a cave called the Lascaux Cave that had interesting pieces of art inside it. This cave, located in France, was discovered 76 years ago and had a passageway called “The Hall of Bulls”. The Hall of Bulls holds a wide variety of carved animal paintings. Paintings of deer, bulls, birds, and bison were carved there thousands of years ago by prehistoric people in a ritual belief. The prehistoric people believed that if they carved paintings of their prey, it would make their hunt more successful.
When I stopped to reflect on this story, I was amazed as how art so old could exist. I never realized that art was something so universal that existed despite what era or culture there was. If there are people, there is art. I also thought it was fascinating how environment affects art. What a culture does and where it is highly affects the art that particular culture makes. In this example, the prehistoric people valued successful hunting trips highly. Because of this, their art depicted their prey.

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cslabell

Hey Amy! i know right isnt it crazy but yet so sad how we dont realize how much we affect the environement. well i guess this is a good example of it. it sucks that by us simply breathing we could ruin this amazing masterpiece. i would still love to see it though! ill wear a mask or something, lol. but yes, art super old can exist and then its awesome how what was art back then could still be art now. i know somethings have changed our outlook in the art world but i mean if it was art at one point i guess it should still be given the respect years later. but this though; i think is definetly art. its so beautiful i got very impacted by it. i hope to one day visit it, or even the area around it. it be pretty interesting to see how life outside the cave would have been.
-Claudia Sanchez

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nkechiokoroma

Before today, I wasn’t too familiar with cave art. I have heard of it before, but never really knew what it was all about. In the video, we focused on Lascaux Cave located in France. This cave was first discovered in 1940 by a 17-year-old named Marcel Ravidat. It was amazing to see how such a young man can discover such a complex setting and one’s age doesn’t really matter when it comes to being innovating. The caves at first were thought to be used for displaying what the people at the time ate. But since there were raindeer bones lying around, that idea was thrown out the window. It is now believed that the cave was used for special rituals and not so much a living space as some might think. When Ravidat was exploring in the cave, he spotted a drawing known as the ‘broken man”. This was a part bird part man figure who was know as a quest seeker. It was interesting to see how even though this was drawn in a cave in France, it was also seen in different time periods in different parts of the world.

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Jessica Obrique

It’s amazing how far art has come from thousands of years ago to today. Things were a lot more simple back then but it’s great to know that there was still an appreciation for art and the things around us. Learning about the Lascaux Cave and Marcel was inspiring even though I’m 4 years older than him when he first discovered it. I think the story is good to tell to young people to motivate them to chase their dreams. You don’t have to be an adult to take risks or become successful. I think it’s a good story to tell to motivate young people. I’m still curious to know what the drawing of the “broken man” is about because there must be a meaning to tell if that symbol is present in other places of the world.

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melissapassarelli

Jessica Obrique,

Marcel Ravidat was 17 years old when he discovered the Lascaux Cave in 1940. It is said that Ravidat found the cave by his dog chasing a rabbit into a hole that led to the cave. I agree with you that his story is motivational to tell other young individuals to chase their dreams no matter their age. Like Zucman stated in his video, “Never think you’re too young or too powerless or too anything to discover.” Ravidat is an inspiration for young people so that they can get out of their comfort zone and try something that they think their not suited for due to their age but in reality it can lead to success.

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beansartblog

Hey Jessica,

I agree with you on how art can really out live people. Like what you said, these cave arts seem very simple but if you look at the art work for hall of the bulls, the whole thing looks very complex. And the Broken Man paintings were very interesting to me as well as it was described as a spiritual resurrection in order for whoever was in the journey to better society with spiritual visions!

Arvan Arguelles

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giancarlovento

Giancarlo Vento

The Lascaux cave was discovered I 1940 by Marcel Ravidat when he was seventeen. Although it was not discovered until 1940 the Lascaux cave is more than 17,000 years old. As Ravidat was searching through the shaft he discovered a painting of a man with a broken neck and an erection. The painting he discovered is actually the first recorded vision quest. I find this especially intriguing because it shows humans have been looking for the “answers to life” and enlightenment. The broken man on a vision quest is a reoccurring image throughout time, it actually is displayed in the movie, The Matrix starring Keanu Reeves. These caves give us insight to how people lived in the Paleolithic age. Some of the paintings in Lascaux include images displaying how humans of that era hunted and gathered. It is fascinating to see that humans have been searching for enlightenment as long as 20,000 years. Considering all the modern technological advancements we have made, it’s surprising that humans today still share a good amount of common ground with a human in the Paleolithic age.

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curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen

I also share the same fascination as you on how it’s fascinating how humans have been searching for enlightenment from 20,000 years ago. It’s quite interesting to observe and ask ourselves “is life better today than it was before?”. Simply because our technology has advanced in such a short time, doesn’t mean that our lives have been enriched. We’re still trying to find answers to life that we were many years ago. I personally don’t believe that our lives are better because of our enhanced technology.

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Maria Leon

Hey Giancarlo!
I definitely agree with you. We are and have always been looking for the “answers to life” like you said. I think we haven’t truly found all the answers but its incredible how many minds created things like the paintings found in the cave and we have access to all of that. It doesn’t give us answers but I think it does help us think of possibilities.

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melissapassarelli

Melissa Passarelli

In the video “The Mind in the Cave,” Glenn Zucman, explains about the book by David Lewis Williams and the Lascaux Cave. The book is called “The Mind in the Cave” where Williams makes an argument about cave painting and how it is a byproduct of religious belief and that it maintains a society with “strict class distinctions.” In the book, he demonstrates similarities between the functions of art in Paleolithic and current eras. Therefore, Zucman talks about the Lascaux Cave that contains hole passages and different types of art in forms of hand prints, geometric, and animals.

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Malina

Pichantha Im
Section 3 2:30-3:45

Before watching this video, my thoughts on cave paintings were stories left behind by ancient people to tell generations after generations. In “The Mind in the Cave,” I took a really big interest in the “Broken Man” drawing. I thought the idea of a man dying and being reborn as a shaman to guide his people through their lives was very intriguing. Today’s art has many forms that is not just paint and a piece of paper. It consists of acrylics, ceramics, wood, fashion, makeup, and other elements one would not have thought could be art. This video has showed me that art can live for centuries. It can outlive me!

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Pamela Ajoste

Pichantha,

I totally agree with you that cave paintings were about stories left behind from generation to generation. I also agree when you said that art has many different forms such as fashion, music, sculpture, drawing and painting etc. Art definitely changed drastically since the discovery of the Lascaux cave in France which was probably one of the biggest milestone in art history and will continue to change in the future.

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curlyhairboy

Darryl Nguyen
Section 3 2:30-3:45

I find it highly fascinating how art was a form of language before even the most basic languages have emerged from mankind. The Lascaux cave in France shows a gallery of art produced by our ancestors to show forms of rituals and tactics they used for hunting and gathering. Aside from instructions, they also show abstract thoughts about life and the meaning of it. Spirituality seemed to be highly prevalent even when there were no language used to be expressed. These paintings hold much more meaning to it than pure aesthetics. They symbolise the journey mankind has come.

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Felix Huynh

Yeah I agree, these cave paintings, if a real representation of the past and what humans used to do or know about the world really shows how much our species has changed. They made their mark on a wall for the future to see, whether they did so on purpose or not, it has given modern humans a chance to look back into the past to see a time where humans were so different, that it gives insight to how we live today as opposed to the past. I personally think it’s great how people thought of preserving history on walls to share with the world later, as learning more about the past can better help our understanding of the present and future. This discovery of the cave shows that anyone can uncover the past, and with the help other others, can finally understand some of it and what our ancestors were trying to show us.

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belenbarragan

Belen Barragan in Reply to Darryl Nguyen

I was thinking the same thing as you. Sometimes we forget how valuable art is because it transcends ages and languages. Here we are thousands of years later, and we could understand what they are drawing about probably better than if it was in a sort of “language”. I think art is a universal language and its clearly seen through the Lascaux cave which depicts things that anyone could understand.

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Leslie Meza

Darryl Nguyen
I found this video to be amazing as well. It was fascinating how the caves are designed and the art that is portrayed. The symbols that they portray seem to have no meaning to some people but i am sure they meant something to our ancestors. The rituals they had and the art of animals was a demonstration of their work rather than what they hunted. The cravings of the bulls and the coloring was cool. So much time that was put into the cave and many people don’t appreciate our ancestors work. After this video i feel curious to one day visit this place.
– Leslie Meza

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Juli Yoshinaga

Hi Darryl,

I agree that the art is so fascinating and art has been here just as long as we have. It is incredible the human beings used art as another form to communicate and have used it to have spiritual connections. Humans tend to try and make all of their experiences meaningful and art is central to humans making those experiences possible. I find it amazing that the cave painting were drawn many, many years ago, yet it was found by the 17 year old boy which is technically communication. We can learn from the past through art and its spiritualism it provides us with.

Juli Yoshinaga

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Jillian Ayala

Hey Darryl, I totally agree with you. Art is language and even art dating back to thousands of years ago, can be interpreted to this day. The symbols aren’t just pictures. They tell a story, leaving behind history for people of today. These painting have spiritual meaning to it and it helps us learn about their beliefs and practices back then. It’s interesting to see how things have changed and how different it is from rpesent day, or even how different it was years after that. Luckily these paintings were preserved for so long and people are able to see them.

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Felix Huynh

I’ve seen a lot of cave painting videos before from classes in the past. What interests me the most, however, is that it’s so different from what we make today. Most people wouldn’t consider the straight figure of the humanoid bird with the broken neck in the video art. Then, we see that it could possibly mean something that happened to them or an experience in their life that caused those people long ago to create it. The strangest thing is when I think of how old some cave paintings are. I’ve seen videos of cave paintings hidden deep within a cave, too dark to see anything without light, which shows that those long ago went in for the purpose of leaving behind a message, or a mark on history that lives on to this day. These paintings show a history through the eyes of the painter, whether true or not, or drawn to show their imagination or the real world, we could never know.

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Stephanie Valdivia

Stephanie Valdivia

Wow Felix those are some interesting thoughts. I really liked how you tried to explain how it was like back then, how people decided to walk through a dark scary cave just to make markings on the walls. I wish there was more to discover so that we could learn even more about the history of mankind. I would love to learn about what the average day was for the person who felt it important enough to leave stories and illustrations on cave walls. I would never venture into a dark place, let alone a CAVE to draw. It really makes you think about the life that was lived back then… I hope we’re close to having a great discovery on this sometime soon.

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belenbarragan

Belen Barragan

In previous art classes or history classes, I think the idea of cave paintings as the earliest form of art has been reiterated quite often. I think its very interesting to be able to actually see visuals and have a geographical view of where this early art took place. As discussed in previous posts, and class mate conversation, the question ‘is art important in our lives’ could very clearly be answered through this video, in my opinion. I think art is kind of part of what makes us human. Its clearly something that has been with the human race since their early ages and has had an evolution of its own alongside us. I think one of the most fascinating things about this video was the archetype of the “broken man”. This reoccurring motif in many forms of art throughout ages shows the importance that humans bestow upon having a “super human” or “god”-like person whom they could follow and be guided by. I particularly found this interesting because it is a link between art and a psychology class that I took last semester which focused on the reoccurring themes that happen in human social life. I think its great that art, provides us such a clear and visual understanding of such themes across the ages as seen with the “broken man” archetype.

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Emily Tomasello - Art

Hi Belen!
Any time I had been in an art or history class, that idea of cave paintings being the earliest form of art was definitely reiterated many, many times. However, I never got to dive too deep into those cave painting lessons, so this Art Talk was really interesting to me. I also found that “broken man” image intriguing myself because it is definitely a depiction that has been reinterpreted throughout history. I think it is pretty cool that images like that have a way of being reborn in a sense, and if we see that image today, we know now know where it came from. It would be fascinating to know what was going on in the minds of those cave artists because we have obviously evolved so much since then, but those emotions and feelings told stories that could be similar to stories told through art today.

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cslabell

Claudia Sanchez
The closest thing I’ve ever gotten to real life”cave” paintings were in Joshua Tree here in California. Story goes that it was a Native American tribe that performed common rituals while making small marking on insides of large rock formations. Those were pretty cool even though the size of about a 4 x 6. But this! Daaaaang these are so cool! Lascaux cave is stunning! I had to google it because WOW, even the google images made me add this to my bucket list of places to visit. Sadly though; I read that they closed it down to the public because the paintings were starting to get damaged. That’s always crazy how something so majestic and wonderful can exist yet we can’t see it because we damage it. But then I think that maybe that’s what keeps it so wonderful and timeless. The fact that it’s not attainable keeps it safe and hopefully for others to enjoy but, I would love to see it myself. The Hall of the Bulls is CRAZY! I’m not sure if it’s the rock canvas or the pigment they used to make the drawings but the images look so surreal. To me they look so perfect as if a computer drew them on there. It looks like a beautiful stampede. Something that you would see in a high budget movie or the Lion King Stampede scene. My astrological sin is Taurus which is represented by the bull, and every time I see a bull I always feel a connection and honor to be represented by such a powerful animal. The big bull on the bottom right hand corner is so beautiful. I know it’s just a picture but it looks so strong, powerful, and important. I wonder if whomever drew them thought about how much impact they were about to invoke in people of the future. I would love to just sit there and see it, I don’t have to take a picture or record it, I just want to sit in the cave and just look at it. It even gives me the chills just thinking about it. I really like though how professor Zucman gave props to its discoverer; Marcel Ravidat. It’s so true; we can never think “I’m too young” “I’m too small” “ I can’t do it” because honestly we can! We just never know when we can stumble upon something great. Even though he didn’t create it himself he was able to be the link between the past and the present and that’s still a very VERY stong and important role! The broken man is also pretty cool, but I must admit that a part of me just wishes it was pure animal drawings. It would be nice to have something this old just focus on animals. I feel like it could have been whole without the representation of man or religion. I mean yeah, I know animals were considered spirit guides and what not, but the Hall of the Bulls just speaks for itself. I think the broken man is what makes people want or need to find connections to things. Just enjoy the animals, juts enjoy that scene; it’s pretty amazing on its own!

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Stephanie Valdivia

Stephanie Valdivia

This video was really cool! I found it interesting how cave art usually consists of three things: hand stencils, animals, and geometric shapes. I was intrigued by the four caves located in France. I wonder why France has so many important caves. I was going to look into this but instead I looked at a different cave other than the Lascaux cave. The Cosquer cave was discovered in 1985 by a diver, Henri Cosquer. Its entrance is super deep, 115 feet below our current sea level. In this cave, there is a high number of hand stencils.This cave was an important find because it was found in an area where no Paleolithic art has ever been found. It was kind of creepy looking at the pictures of the hand stencils located here because some hands had incomplete fingers. Why are there multiple hand stencils with incomplete fingers? It’s fascinating how we can learn so much about man’s history just by looking at drawings located inside caves.

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haileilauren

Stephanie,
That’s so cool that you heard about an underwater cave with cave art in it. I wonder if there are a lot of hand stencils because when the cavemen were in the cave for the special occasions, they only got inspired by another caveman’s hand. This underwater cave also makes me thing and realize how much the earth has change. This is because this cave probably wasn’t always underwater and its cool that looking at art also brings upon questions about life.
-Hailei Reyes

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Pamela Ajoste

Seventeen-year-old Marcel Ravidat and nineteen-year-old friend discovered a cave located in Lascaux, France. The art in this cave dates back to 16,000 years ago. This cave consists of famous cave art including Hall of Bulls, Axial gallery, Mondmilch Gallery, and Chamber of the Felines. When people hear “cave art” most people think of stick figures and basic scratching or markings on the wall; however, the arts on these caves were much more intricate. I think that it was pretty interesting how cavemen didn’t actually live in the caves but only entered for special occasions. In the cave, Ravidat discovered a drawing called the “broken man.” This drawing was part man and part bird which was also seen in other parts of the world.

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Emily Tomasello - Art

Emily Tomasello
This week’s Art Talk had us “dive into” some upper-paleolithic cave art. I used to think cave art was just stick figures and hand prints depicting people, animals, and plants drawn by cave men, so it was nice to get some more insightful background information. People lived their lives outside of these caves, and they only really went inside for special occasions, such as a ritual. There are basically three types of art that you can find in these caves, and they are hand prints, geometric art and animals. The Lascaux Cave discussed in this video was discovered in 1940 by a man named Marcel Ravidat. He was only seventeen when he discovered this cave, which was crazy to me! Even at nineteen, I would be way too nervous (and inexperienced) to go searching through these caves! Lascaux is huge and filled with many elaborate galleries, halls and passages, such as the Hall of the Bulls, the Axial Gallery and the Chamber of Felines. Being a crazy cat lady, I would have loved to dive a little deeper into that last one. This video was very interesting to me because, as I mentioned before, I knew very little about cave art, so it was pretty cool to learn that they were much deeper and way more elaborate than I had previously thought.

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Leslie Meza

Leslie Meza
Watching this video made me realize how art can be found everywhere. It was amazing to see the map of the Lascaux cave in France. The passage way of the cave and how it is broken down into sections with different forms of art seems cool. Just thinking about how hard it might of been for our ancestors to break through the rocks and create a gallery. Another thing mentioned was the book of David Louis William. Mr. William illustrated an image of the cave and mentioned the art found in the cave. The cave which was designed for special occasions has art of animals that were not hunted by our ancestors. I found it awesome when Glenn spoke about how the cave can be considered a place to invite your friends for the Super Bowl. This made me think of how fun and relaxing this place could be. Overall, this video was great. The demonstration of the caves route and the art that is painted on the walls has created an image in my head of how the place may look. The video has encouraged to visit the cave if i ever travel to France.

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lizzystiller

Hi Leslie,
You bring up a great point that art can absolutely be found anywhere and that is a crazy idea to me. Whether it be from a person in a different country or someone from millions of years ago, we are connect by art. While we all have our different forms and taste, we all have that creativity side to us. It’s almost heartwarming to think of the people gathering in the caves to admire the art they made millions of years ago. When I think of cavemen, I think of people struggling to survive and find food and shelter. But this idea of a cave being a sort of meeting place to just gather and have a great time honestly makes me happy. There is always time for friends and family to get together. Art is so powerful that it allows us to drop what we are doing and join together to admire and feel connected.

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meganchung07

Yeah it’s really cool to find art everywhere no matter what place it is in the world or what time frame. I was actually thinking the same thing! The caves are really similar to an art gallery. Art is a good way to feel connected to people and is a good way to express yourself. I feel like a lot of information about culture and lifestyle can be figured out by looking at the art created at that time

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Dabidlai

David Lai

Hi Leslie, I had the same reaction as you when you brought up that the professor’s mentioning of the cave as inviting friends over for the Super Bowl. It must have been exciting for the cave visitors to witness all this new art in front of their eyes. I can only imagine that due to the lack of illumination back then, it was difficult, but perhaps even more beautiful in the night time if someone were to start a fire in those caves to tell a story. As each level progresses, another story is told within each level. I feel that the more experience people in the community must have drawn more elaborate and immense art in the deeper crevices of the cave as it is a longer way from the entrance; indicating the lifeline of these people. The Lascaux Cave concedes the notion that people are more artistically motivated and moved than they know it sometimes, and shows that art can be found anywhere, especially on the walls of an ancient cave.

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lizzystiller

Lizzy Stiller 2:30

I found this video to be very interesting. It always surprises me to learn just how far back art goes. These cave paintings show how deep in our genetic make up, the need for art and creativity is. In France the famous Lascaux Cave was discovered. The art work varied from hand prints, to geometric shapes, to animals. First of al I just wanted to say how cool it must be to stumble across something as historically significant as this cave. It makes me wonder just how many more caves full of prehistoric paintings are out there. I also did not know that the people did not live in the caves. I always assumed they did since that’s how it is in the movies. I feel it makes the cave paintings that more special to have. They transform this barren hole in the ground to be a sacred place they would visit for important occasions. It also makes me wonder though how they did it. Lacking our convenient technology, how did they get it all the way on the ceiling. If I was a caveman personally, I wouldn’t even imagine to put it on the ceiling, it’s too difficult. It’s amazing how much effort and care they put into their art. It inspires us to keep the legacy going.

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Jillian Ayala

It’s crazy to think that cave art from thousands and thousands of years ago can be preserved for that long. I was expecting simple geometric shapes/symbols/hieroglyphics, but when pictures were presented, I saw elaborate cave art of animals painted on the walls, which also consisted of handprints/hand stencils/geometric shapes. It’s amazing because for people who don’t have much resources or tools,they were able to create such beautiful art, in hard to reach places such as the ceiling. This idea of only going to caves for special occasions, rituals, or religious practices is really fascinating. It’s based off the fact that there are little to no art of humans on the walls and its of mostly animals. Also, since these hunter gatherers mostly ate reindeer(we know this because of all the reindeer bones), we know these pictures of the animals cannot mean it was about food/hunting animals. It shows that it had something to do with their beliefs or religion which is very insightful/helps us learn about the people of the past. It’s very interesting to learn about what it might’ve been like at the time.

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beansartblog

Arvan Arguelles

Diving straight into the caves, I feel like it’s very interesting to see decorated cave arts in Southern France and Northern Spain. Altamira, Lascaux, Chauvet, and Cosquer are some of the very popular ones. One of the earliest cave arts are found in 1940 in Lascaux. These caves are mentioned for special events, these painted caves had the theories of having to do with hunting, but these were outdated because the animals that they painted were not the animals that they hunted. Three types of art were found in the caves, they were hand- prints, geometric arts, and animals. These included dots, grids, hand – prints, and animals, which were described as beautiful. There were no human figures. Professor described these caves to be thirteen feet tall with evidence of scaffolding, but as the deeper the caves go, only scratches are found. These caves were used perhaps for quests. Looking at hall of the bulls, these paintings were beautiful! I mean they look amazing seeing the fact that they didn’t have that many art tools. It’s crazy how nice these paintings look. A the bottom of the caves, there are lots of odd paintings, such as the “broken man.” This was significant to old societies because these vision quests helped better societies with spiritual visions and knowledge.

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meganchung07

I think that this video was very interesting! It’s really cool to see how far back art has came from. When I think of cave man drawings, I only think of very basic drawings of maybe a sun or a person made using their fingers dipped in animal blood. After watching this video, I found out that it is actually a lot more intricate than that!
Another thing i got from this video is how influential culture can be to art. I already knew this but this video made me think deeper into it. Because art encompasses life and lifestyle, art is a good way to understand culture more. For instance, the prehistoric people put value in hunting so in their art, there were lots of art about hunting and prey.

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Daniel Puentes

Daniel Puentes
I agree, these cave paintings are truly remarkable. I appreciated the fact that these people took so much time to create this art. Like you said it really shows the intellect of the people from 17,300 years ago. These artist wanted to display their culture and they were able to display it with these cave paintings.

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Dabidlai

David Lai,

“The Mind in the Cave” illustrates cave art in its simplest form, despite the primitive nature that surrounds the name, emanates an inspiring presence alongside its reputation. The Lascaux Cave in France depicts the very nature of the surreal forms of art that is a predecessor to our times. Having pieces of drawings among its walls that are several thousands years old although it was discovered in 1940 speaks a story of its own. Runic in nature, but very vividly demonstrates the thoughts and ideas that revolved around the people’s living communities in these times. In the cave, there are different levels that were excavated and each level had different forms of art. In the second level, just passed the entrance, was the Hall of Bulls; which had more elaborate than the typical drawings for their times of animals. As hunting was the primary source of sustenance for the people, more than likely they were to paint their meals on the walls. This tells the story of these men and women because back in those days, there weren’t bills to worry about, homework to do, only basic survival skills. Art has transcended a long way to what it is now, and the roots of art that are depicted in the cave might have even been inspired by certain forms before then.

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Daniel Puentes

Daniel Puentes
In this week’s video we learned about the The Lascaux Caves. The caves date back 17,300 years. The Lascaux caves are a complex set of caves that are covered in paintings. The Lascaux caves was a ritual place for painting and meditating. I find these caves very cool because the paintings are very visual and it gives a view of what life was like 17,300 years ago. My favorite painting that I saw would have to be of the man with the bow and arrow hunting the deer. The handprints are awesome because that means we are looking at the hands of people who lived thousands of years ago.

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haileilauren

Hailei Reyes

This week’s art talk was interesting to see another form of art. I would have never thought that these caves that were being drawn in would have been that long and have different lines or lanes and ways to go. I found that to be an interesting point because they found these cave drawings in this big “gallery” that isn’t that well lit in all the different ways to go. How did they see what they were drawing in the parts where only one person could fit? I also found it interesting that they never drew humans. This is because some people say that art imitates life and as humans they didn’t draw what they saw.

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Maria Leon

Maria Leon
The exact story to how Marcel Ravidat and his friends found the Lascaux cave is not a for sure story but what is known for sure is that they made one of the biggest discovery in Art history. The cave was discovered on September 12, 1940. The paintings are dated to about 15,000 bc but they may have been created over a longer period. I think it is incredible that we can see art that was created so long ago now it’s not only art but a treasure as well. We might not exactly know why they painted those paintings or what they mean but we can have an idea. Another cave I have learned about is the Chauvet cave and it has similar paintings to the ones found in the Lascaux. The Chauvet cave was discovered on December 18, 1994 which was not that long ago, eight days after I was born and it also has incredible paintings mostly of animals. These caves are truly treasures that contain human history.

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